The Manchester Free Press

Saturday • January 29 • 2022

Vol.XIV • No.IV

Manchester, N.H.

The Constitutional Case for NH Independence (CACR 32)

Free Keene - 3 hours 55 min ago

This is an e-mail I sent to NH state reps around Jan 26, 2022.

—–

RepFolk: Here are some reasons you should feel “Constitutionally comfortable” voting for CACR 32…the right of the people to vote on whether we keep being ruled by an empire that starts a new war at our expense every three years or so.

What’s nice about the U.S. Constitution is that you generally don’t have to be a “Constitutional scholar” to understand it.

1) The Tenth Amendment makes the U.S. Constitution innocent of banning independence, until proven guilty. It reads: “The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.” By default, “the powers,” thus includes the power of states and/or their voters to divorce D.C. In order for the U.S. to lawfully wield a power preventing that, such power would have to be “delegated to the United States by the Constitution.” Where does that Constitution clearly grant such power to D.C.? Why are the “anti-independence” Constitutional passages cited so unclear on this question when compared to the clarity of “The Tenth?”

2) Even if we were to assume, for the sake of discussion, that the Constitutional arguments against independence were valid…that leaves a different problem for Remainers. No one could credibly argue that the U.S. government has complied with its Constitution…not even during the last two hours, let alone the last two centuries. Have they voided their contract, perhaps millions of times? If they are not required to follow their Constitution, why are we?

3) If one could argue that the U.S. Constitution forbids the public from voting on independence this year, one could just as easily argue that the pre-existing NH Constitution *demands* it this year. Article 10 reads: “…whenever the ends of government are perverted, and public liberty manifestly endangered, and all other means of redress are ineffectual, the people may, and of right ought to reform the old, or establish a new government.” Has Washington endangered – or not endangered – “public liberty?” Are you currently able to “redress” your grievances with D.C.?

4) You face, perhaps for the first time, legislation which would actually end the central government’s practice of running employment bans and overseas TORTURE CHAMBERS* at NH taxpayer expense. Why have some of your House colleagues apparently picked *this* moment to begin pretending they follow either Constitution?

Dave Ridley
NHexit.com
“Independence without enmity”

* https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bagram_torture_and_prisoner_abuse



NH HB 1022 – Permitting Pharmacists to Dispense Ivermectin Without a Prescription

Free Keene - Tue, 2022-01-25 20:34 +0000

Rep. Leah Cushman presents HB 1022 at the public hearing on 1/18/22

 

On January 12, 2022, Rep. Leah Cushman (R – NH) introduced New Hampshire HB 1022: an act permitting pharmacists to dispense the drug ivermectin by means of a standing order entered into by licensed healthcare professionals. The general argument is that many healthcare workers are unable to prescribe ivermectin, either because of hospital politics or outside pressures. This bill would override the need for a prescription for ivermectin, allowing everyone in New Hampshire to pick it up over-the-counter.

A public hearing for this bill took place on January 18, 2022. Rep. Cushman, House committee (Health, Human Services, & Elderly Affairs) members, doctors, and others took part in a lively discussion that spanned over two hours. The overall consensus appeared to be in favor of the bill, with a few speakers pleading that those who cannot (or do not) get the covid-19 vaccine need another readily-available, tried, and tested alternative.

The Benefits of Ivermectin Are Well Established

The only medicine for infectious diseases to win the Nobel Prize has recently been smeared in the mainstream media. Surprised? There are innumerable studies that have overwhelmingly shown the benefits of this drug to combat all types of disease. The difference is that now the media has portrayed it as livestock medicine, and nobody can seem to counteract the bad press–not even Joe Rogan.

However, most of those in attendance, including multiple committee members, fully supported pushing this bill further. Even those who believe that vaccines are the best option had to admit that withholding medicine to those who cannot or do not get the vaccine doesn’t make sense. In fact, people who have received the vaccine can benefit from ivermectin as well.

Dr. Paul Marik Was in Attendance

One speaker of note was Dr. Paul Marik, who traveled to the public hearing for NH HB 1022 all the way from Virginia.

A former professor of medicine & chief of pulmonary and critical care medicine at Eastern Virginia Medical School, Dr. Marik famously sued the hospital he worked for in an effort to prescribe ivermectin to his patients with covid-19. The health system his hospital is part of has banned ivermectin. He ended up resigning in disgust December 31, 2021. During his public arguments in favor of HB 1022, Dr. Marik described ivermectin as “cheap, exceedingly safe, and exceedingly effective.”

If ivermectin had been promoted at the beginning of this pandemic, we would not be sitting here today.” – Dr. Paul Marik, NH HB 1022 public hearing, 1/18/22

 

Watch the Full 2 Hour Public Hearing Below: (6:01:00 – 8:00:00)

 

What’s Next?

The next steps are for the House Committee on Health, Human Services, & Elderly Affairs to deliberate, and eventually hold an executive session where NH HB 1022 will be voted on by attending committee members. Executive sessions are open to the public, but at the time of this writing no date has yet been set. Stay tuned!

 

Representative Brodie Deshaies: Ignorant or a Liar?

Free Keene - Tue, 2022-01-25 04:09 +0000

Brodie Deshaies at the hearing looking guilty while Carla Gericke calls him out for using scare tactics

Representative Brodie Deshaies from Wolfeboro, New Hampshire testified in front of the State-Federal Relations and Veteran Affairs Committee on January 20, 2022 concerning CACR 32. The legislation seeks to let the people of New Hampshire vote to amend the Constitution and become an independent nation, breaking ties with DC. He was the legislator asked by the committee chairman to do the bulk of the research before the hearing.

Looking closely at all the claims Deshaies made about the legality of this bill and the implications concerning lawmakers voting to recommend that the House pass it, it is hard to decide if he is ignorant and easily swayed by empire-loving “constitutional scholars” from DC or if he gave a speech full of lies to sway the vote. He used fear-mongering language directed at the committee, implying that they may be charged by Washington DC if they vote ‘Ought To Pass’ and supported the bill through the legal process. This article is a close-up look at his claims and will look at all the material he references to see if he is really making a constitutional argument against CACR 32.

Deshaies starts off with an acknowledgment of how the public perceives him. There are some people who are pretty upset with me in the room,” he says. This is already very indicative of his character. He sent Elliot “Alu” Axelman (the editor-in-chief of LibertyBlock.com and the author of multiple books on secession) an email full of misinterpretations of the US and New Hampshire Constitutions a few weeks ago. When Alxelman politely asked if he wished to engage in a public debate on the topic, Deshaies cowered and declined. Without the opportunity to debate Deshaies, and with no legislator agreeing to debate him, Alu published his rebuttal to Deshaies’ anti-independence letter on his website. The article destroys the few arguments that the anti-freedom legislator sought to make in his letter. Instead, Deshaies went on to publish the exact same letter in an op-ed article on NHJournal.com. So, now we know he knows how people feel about his twisting of the facts, but he just goes on to ignore the people and doubles down on his way of thinking. We see from this very first sentence that he isn’t the sort of person who feels he should be in office doing what the people of New Hampshire want. He feels he’s in office to rule over the citizens of New Hampshire with an iron fist.

He goes on to say that after speaking to many “constitutional scholars” such as David Williams, author of “The Mythic Meanings of the Second Amendment”, that he believes this committee was engaged in a “constitutional process” by voting Ought to Pass or Inexpedient to Legislate. Which means every vote cast is “aiding in the constitutional process,” and “approving it at each time along the way”.

Deshaies claims, “Every vote cast has a constitutional ramification judging by amendment fourteen of the US Constitution, section three. Some scholars would argue that this is rebelling, even if it’s peaceful. This very well could be an argument where voting for this, aiding and abetting in that process could very well be unconstitutional.”

So, there it is, folks. Deshaies spoke to a man who wrote a book arguing that the second amendment doesn’t really give all Americans the right to bear arms for advice on what the Constitution says. Then, he came up with a clever way to subtly scare the other members of the committee out of voting Ought to Pass on this bill. He used a mildly veiled threat of ‘insurrection’ and ‘rebellion’ to convince everyone on the committee to vote 21-0 against recommending the bill to be passed. Even the two committee members who told Axelman that they would support the legislation ultimately caved to the fear and voted to kill it.

Amendment Fourteen Section Three of the US Constitution is written in legalese, so here is an explanation of it from AnnenbergClassroom.org;

“Amendment XIV, Section 3 prohibits any person who had gone to war against the union or given aid and comfort to the nation’s enemies from running for federal or state office, unless Congress by a two-thirds vote specifically permitted it”.

This has nothing to do with a committee in New Hampshire voting ‘Ought to Pass’ on a bill that would allow the citizens of New Hampshire to vote to become an independent nation. The representatives already took their oaths. Hopefully, if they had gone to war against the federal government, that would have been looked into before they were sworn in. That is what the fourteenth amendment, section three is discussing. It’s a far cry from allowing the people the chance to possibly vote on peacefully separating from their abusive rulers in DC.

Even if the part of the US Constitution Deshaies cited was relevant, voting Ought to Pass on CACR 32 would not constitute rebellion. According to Black’s Law Dictionary, rebellion is defined as “Deliberate, organized resistance, by force and arms, to the laws or operations of the government, committed by a subject”. It is ridiculous to assert that by allowing an amendment of the New Hampshire Constitution to appear on the ballot by proper peaceful and lawful procedure, his fellow committee members would be engaging in violent resistance against the federal government. If Granite Staters voted and it became law, we would immediately no longer be a part of the federal government. That would not be rebelling, that would be peaceful separation.

Deshaies goes on to say that part one, article ten of the New Hampshire constitution does not apply to the federal government. The referenced article reads, “Government being instituted for the common benefit, protection, and security, of the whole community, and not for the private interest or emolument of any one man, family, or class of men; therefore, whenever the ends of government are perverted, and public liberty manifestly endangered, and all other means of redress are ineffectual, the people may, and of right ought to reform the old, or establish a new government. The doctrine of nonresistance against arbitrary power, and oppression, is absurd, slavish, and destructive of the good and happiness of mankind.” It does not specify “The New Hampshire government can be reformed or a new state government established.” It simply uses the word “government.” The authors of the NH Constitution were smart enough to know the difference. If they intended for the article to apply only to the state government, they would have said so. Brodie Deshaies gives no explanation for why he thinks article ten only applies to the state government. The right of revolution isn’t specifically granted to the federal government in the US Constitution, and according to the Tenth Amendment to the US Constitution, that means that right is delegated to the states. Thankfully, the New Hampshire Constitution has this right clearly and articulately established. Granite Staters have the right to reform any government that has become perverse and/or establish a new one. CACR 32 would seek to reform the state government we have by striking all references to the United States in the New Hampshire Constitution, state statutes, and regulations.

Deshaies does acknowledge that people in New Hampshire today are upset about the amount of powers the federal government claims to have over them. He says “New Hampshire lost some of that sovereignty because we accepted federal dollars and we ceded a number of responsibilities. Now, we’re still sovereign, technically, over this. We can, through the constitutional process, freely take back those powers. It just means we’re going to have to be giving up the carrots. We took the carrot, we get the stick.” I’m not sure what carrot he’s referring to, because the federal government does nothing but leech off of New Hampshire. New Hampshire is a donor state, meaning Granite Staters pay hundreds of millions per year more in taxes to the federal government than the state government receives back in funding. Also, I’m pretty sure that the saying has to do with getting the carrot OR the stick. Brodie Deshaies would be free to move to another state if Granite Staters voted to leave the union and keep their wealth. Massachusetts is less than 100 miles from his house, and there he can take all the carrots and sticks he wants from the federal government.

Continuing to speak about the constitutional process, Deshaies says, “I think people are misguided and they’re providing an answer that isn’t the right answer, that isn’t the constitutional answer. They’re trying to work outside of the constitutional government to get this done.” That just isn’t true. CACR 32 went through all the proper channels and is a valid constitutional amendment. Just because Deshaies doesn’t think it is the right answer doesn’t mean Granite Staters should not be allowed to vote on the issue. He would be allowed to vote on the ballot like everyone else. The people deserve to have their say. As far as secession movements go, this is literally the most legal, peaceful method of seceding that any state has ever attempted in human history.

After the meeting, Joa of Breaking the Flaw confronted Deshaies publicly in the hallway of the Legislative Office Building and asked him why he would oppose this legislation so heavily and asked if he believed he was really representing the people. Deshaies stated, “I’ve had more constituents contact me to oppose it than I’ve had, you know I had two contact me to oppose it and I haven’t had any contact me to support it.” Deshaies didn’t represent his constituents that day if he believes two people contacting him to oppose CACR 32 is good enough for him to get in front of the committee and misrepresent what the US and New Hampshire Constitutions say to scare the committee into voting Inexpedient to Legislate for fear of being prosecuted by the federal government for rebellion.

Next, CACR 32 will go in front of the full House for a roll call vote, possibly on February 15th. Contact your representative and tell them you want them to defend democracy by supporting this bill, so that the people of New Hampshire can vote on it in November of 2022.

“COVID Carols” Now in Audio Form!

Free Keene - Mon, 2022-01-24 23:01 +0000

Captain Kickass’ “COVID Carols” – Click for Printable PDF.

In December of 2020, we gave you a super-fun Christmas gift in the form of the COVID Carols songsheet!  At the time, Captain Kickass wrote some awesome parody lyrics to four classic Christmas songs and you can download a PDF of the lyrics here to sing them yourself!

This Winter, the Captain has taken the time to produce a three-song EP and is offering them on his website, which features a bunch of other parody songs.

You can listen to them all for free and then buy the record for whatever price you want to pay!  Check them out on his Bandcamp page here.

Featuring:

  • “The Lockdowns Are Dumb” – to the tune of “Little Drummer Boy”
  • “Do you fear what I fear?” – to the tune of “Do you hear what I hear?”
  • “Sterile Little Christmas” – to the tune of “Have yourself a merry little Christmas”

Update: New NH HB 1025 Aims to Limit Witnessing Police

Free Keene - Mon, 2022-01-24 22:23 +0000

This bill would give police the right to tell any person they must stay back at least 30 feet.

 

A new bill was introduced to the NH House on January 5, 2022 that, if passed, could have serious, far-reaching consequences for 1st amendment auditors and anyone attempting to witness or film police interactions in New Hampshire.  

Introduced by Rep. Al Baldasaro (R – Rockingham 5) and cosponsored by Rep. David Love, Rep. Vanessa Sheehan, Sen. Sharon Carson, Sen. Bob Giuda, and other Republicans, the bill attempts to add an 11th section to Chapter 642 of the Criminal Code; (642:11 Impeding or Provoking a Law Enforcement Officer.) 

Update

NH HB 1025 was presented to the New Hampshire House Committee on January 19, 2022. Committee members voted unanimously to recommend ITL (inexpedient to legislate) status for this bill. Nineteen of the 21 members were present, with a final vote in favor of ITL: “Yea” – 19 votes; “Nay” – 0 votes; with 2 not voting. You can view the vote in the video below (48:35 – 52:10.)

Opens the Way for “Feelings-Based” Policing

In essence, the update would give police vague avenues by which to arrest someone if they deem that person is “interrupting, disrupting, hindering, impeding, or interfering” in any way with their police work. What one officer deems “disrupting” another may deem perfectly fine, so this appears to leave the door open for interpretation. It also leaves the door open for policing based on “feelings.” Generally when things are left open to interpretation based on “feelings” it is our Constitutional rights that go by the wayside. 

This bill would give police the right to tell any person that they must stay back at least 30 feet from any scene, for any reason. For example, if you’ve been told to stay back, and continue to approach, they could slap you with a class A misdemeanor for “interference” or any one of those other terms they’ll have at their behest. If a police officer tells you to stay back and you’re closer than 30 feet, if you don’t move back to the 30 foot mark, they could slap you with a class A misdemeanor. If an officer “feels” you’re provoking a physical response, same drill. See how this works?  

Impeding or Provoking a Law Officer (642:11)

  • I. After receiving a verbal warning from a law enforcement officer not to approach, no person shall:
  • (a) Violate such warning and approach;
  • (b) Remain within 30 feet of a law enforcement officer who is engaged in the lawful performance of any legal duty with the intent to:
  • (1) Interrupt, disrupt, hinder, impede, or interfere with the law enforcement officer   s ability to perform such duty; or
  • (2) Provoke a physical response from the law enforcement officer.
  • II. A person who violates this section shall be guilty of a class A misdemeanor.
  • 2  Effective Date.  This act shall take effect January 1, 2023.

 

How Might This Affect the Filming of Police in New Hampshire?

The bill clearly states that if an officer verbally warns you not to approach, you cannot approach that officer or that scene at all: “After receiving a verbal warning from a law enforcement officer not to approach, no person shall violate such warning and approach.”

While HB 1025 does detail a 30-foot-distance rule once a person has been told to step back, it does not detail at what distance an officer is allowed to initially shout to you that you mustn’t approach a scene. Could it be a warning they shout at you from 100 feet away? What about when you’re 300 feet away? If they just don’t “feel” like “dealing” with someone filming them, could they technically shout to you from any distance not to approach?  

Many times, as we’ve seen in the news, video footage of police encounters is what clears the innocent and brings responsibility to police actions. This bill would allow the police to bar virtually any person from any scene that they deem a nuisance. When the ability to film police encounters is diminished, our Constitutional freedoms quickly follow. What starts as 15 feet will become 30 feet, then 50.

Breaking the Flaw, a well-known New Hampshire videographer, had this to say about the new bill: “As someone who likes to witness police interactions with a camera, I find it absurd that the direction of this bill will limit our ability for government transparency.”

 

Similar Legislation is Popping Up All Over

Recently, Rep. John Kavanaugh (R – Arizona), an ex-police officer, sponsored a bill that would require “anyone with a camera” to stay 15 feet away from a scene or police officer in Arizona. According to a MSM report dated 1/22/22, “The lawmaker said he has been approached by officers in Tucson who were concerned that people recording them were getting too close for the officers’ and their own safety.” 

In July of 2021, Rep. Alex Rizo (R – Florida) introduced a bill very similar in wording to New Hampshire HB 1025, making it unlawful to “interrupt, disrupt, hinder, impede, or interfere” with a police officer within 30 feet. Under Florida HB 11, any person who is deemed by an officer to cause a disturbance faces a 2nd degree misdemeanor. What constitutes a disturbance is completely based on how the officer “feels” in a given situation.

In May of 2021, Governor Kevin Stitt (R – Oklahoma) signed HB 1643, which took effect Nov. 1, 2021. Under this legislation, it’s unlawful to post a video or photo of a police officer with “threatening intent” (as defined by a judge or prosecutor.) In addition, HB 2273 makes it unlawful to publish any personally identifiable information of a law enforcement officer, including in video recordings. This includes an officer’s name, birth date, address, telephone number, driver license number, Social Security number, or place of employment, and includes “a photograph or any other realistic likeness of the person.”

 

Safety From Scrutiny

By “officer safety” they perhaps really mean “safety from scrutiny.”

Long has it been a curious thing to ponder how a camera can affect officer safety. If anything, filming the police has led to increased public safety by holding armed thugs with shiny badges accountable for their actions. While I can think of many examples of filming the police resulting in public safety, I can’t think of many instances where filming the police led to the police being harmed somehow. By “officer safety” they perhaps really mean “safety from scrutiny.”

“It’s hard to see such a blanket ban as anything but a targeted assault on First Amendment activity,” says Ari Cohn, a First Amendment lawyer who works at TechFreedom, a think tank dedicated to technology issues. “Cops have long tried claiming that the act of filming them in itself obstructs their ability to do their job…and now that this argument failed, they are rather transparently trying to create a safe space from observation by the people they are sworn to serve.”

What You Can Do

  • Contact your representatives
  • Contact the ACLU
  • Attend legislative sessions
  • Know your rights
  • Always film the police!

Brave NH Native Records in Court Lobby Despite Threats from Armed Goon

Free Keene - Mon, 2022-01-24 01:00 +0000

In October of 2021, nine peaceful people were arrested at a well-attended executive council meeting. It started when armed state goons approached activists Frank “Footloose” Staples and Terese Grinnell and requested they to follow them to a partitioned area in the back of the room. Once out of sight of the packed audience, the thugs arrested Footloose and Terese, causing them to verbally announce what was happening. Prior to being asked to walk out, the two were sitting in the audience quietly, so they are still unsure regarding why they were arrested in the first place, as they didn’t make any noise prior to the arrest. So far, the court process has yet to clarify the situation.

Seven other people were also arrested for speaking out during the arrests of Footloose and Terese. The “New Hampshire Nine” had a court hearing on Friday to deal with some pending motions and unlike the rest of the Nine, Footloose is representing himself in the case. If you’ve seen his other videos, you know that means it won’t be dull. Here’s a video with highlights from his visit, including he and other activists bravely refusing to stop recording when threatened by a masked court goon. You can see the full uncut series of videos he recorded at Concord district court on his Odysee.

It’s also worth noting that there is an unconstitutional “Supreme Court” of NH order in place prohibiting recording in all parts of state courthouses except the courtrooms themselves. Those restrictions were put in place because of Keene activists recording over a decade ago and haven’t been meaningfully challenged ever since. Kudos to New Hampshire native Footloose for standing up for the right to record and the right to transparency. It was nice to see him back down the armed goon AND he did it while on bail conditions for his previous ridiculous victimless arrests.

Stay tuned here to Free Keene for the latest on his saga.

Bill Hearings for Week of January 24, 2022

N.H. Liberty Alliance - Sun, 2022-01-23 21:54 +0000
  • These are the most liberty-critical hearings for the week
  • Click on the bill number to read the bill.
  • Click on the committee name to email the committee your thoughts.

Of the 118 hearings in the House, we are recommending support of 17 and opposition of 22 with 17 being of interest.
Of the 70 hearings in the Senate, we are recommending support of 2 and opposition of 2 with 7 being of interest.

Position Bill Title Committee Day Time Room State Analysis
Oppose HB1680 establishing a foundation opportunity budget program for funding public education. Education Mon 1/24 10:00 AM LOB Room 205-207 This bill modifies the determination and funding for an opportunity for a constitutionally adequate education by establishing foundation opportunity budgets and state foundation opportunity grants.
Of Interest SB246 relative to qualified private communities. Election Law and Municipal Affairs Mon 1/24 1:45 PM SH Room 100 This bill defines and regulates “qualified private communities.”
Of Interest SB425 relative to the establishment of an election information portal. Election Law and Municipal Affairs Mon 1/24 2:00 PM SH Room 100 This bill authorizes the secretary of state to develop an election information portal.
Of Interest CACR30 officers of the government. Providing that the elected positions of inspectors general are created. Executive Departments and Administration Mon 1/24 1:15 PM LOB Room 302-304 This constitutional amendment concurrent resolution establishes the positions of inspectors general to investigation elections fraud and fraud by elected officials, as well as allows an inspector general with probable cause to prosecute findings of fraud.
Of Interest HB1294 requiring the commission on demographic trends to consider data on race and ethnicity for the purpose of increasing racial and ethnic diversity in New Hampshire. Executive Departments and Administration Mon 1/24 2:15 PM LOB Room 302-304 This bill requires the commission on demographic trends to consider data on race and ethnicity for the purpose of increasing racial and ethnic diversity in New Hampshire.
Of Interest HB1439 relative to hospital visitation policies. Health, Human Services and Elderly Affairs Mon 1/24 10:00 AM LOB Room 210-211 This bill allows, with limited exception, a patient to designate a parent, spouse, family member, or other caregiver to be present while the patient receives hospital care.
Support HB1608 requiring the department of health and human services to contact certain individuals whose information was included in the state immunization registry. Health, Human Services and Elderly Affairs Mon 1/24 11:00 AM LOB Room 210-211 This bill requires the department of health and human services to contact individuals who, pursuant to emergency order #76, were not given an opportunity to opt out of having COVID-19 vaccination information included in the state immunization registry.
Of Interest HB1405 allowing out-of-state mental health care providers to provide telehealth treatment during a mental health emergency. Health, Human Services and Elderly Affairs Mon 1/24 2:15 PM LOB Room 210-211 This bill allows out-of-state mental health care providers to provide telehealth treatment during a mental health emergency and requires insurance coverage for out-of-state mental health services provided through telemedicine.
Of Interest HB1518 relative to the requirements for appointed guardians. Children and Family Law Tue 1/25 10:00 AM LOB Room 206-208 This bill establishes the requirement for guardians appointed by the court to receive a home visit within 30 days of their appointment to verify the safety and adequacy of the home for the minor and the consequences for failing to do so.
Of Interest HB1431 establishing the parental bill of rights. Children and Family Law Tue 1/25 2:15 PM LOB Room 206-208 This bill establishes a parental bill of rights, a framework for notice of, and to report violations of, such rights, and consequences for affirmative findings of violations.
Of Interest SB217 relative to eviction notices. Commerce Tue 1/25 9:15 AM SH Room 100 This bill modifies the circumstances under which a landlord may evict a tenant and modifies the requirements relating to eviction notices.
Support SB249 prohibiting planning and zoning ordinances that prohibit short-term rentals. Commerce Tue 1/25 9:30 AM SH Room 100 This bill prohibits municipalities from adopting ordinances that ban short-term rentals. This bill also allows municipalities to adopt ordinances requiring the owner of a short-term rental to register the name of a person in state who can receive service of process.
Oppose HB1660 relative to school lunches and establishing the meals for students fund. Education Tue 1/25 9:00 AM LOB Room 205-207 This bill requires schools to make free or reduced cost breakfast and lunch available to children who meet federal eligibility guidelines and provides for reimbursement to schools for offering meals at no cost to eligible students. The requirement is repealed in 2025.
Of Interest SB238 relative to special education services in chartered public schools. Education Tue 1/25 9:15 AM LOB Room 101 This bill requires chartered public schools to enter into a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with a resident district of a student with disabilities who is attending the chartered public school concerning special education services.
Oppose SB426 relative to the adequate education grants for fiscal year 2023. Education Tue 1/25 9:45 AM LOB Room 101 This bill requires the commissioner of education to use highest of the average daily membership in residence for school years 2020, 2021, and 2022 in calculating adequate education grants for fiscal year 2023.
Of Interest SB261 relative to net metering participation. Energy and Natural Resources Tue 1/25 9:30 AM SH Room 103 This bill clarifies provisions relative to net energy metering participation and allows customer-generators to receive a payment for negative net energy usage during the subsequent billing cycle in an amount equivalent to certain credits.
Of Interest SB269 relative to the New Hampshire weatherization program. Energy and Natural Resources Tue 1/25 9:45 AM SH Room 103 This bill reduces the contractor pre-qualifications for contracts pertaining to the New Hampshire weatherization assistance program and calls for the weatherization of re-purposed buildings such as mill buildings.
Support HB1187 relative to milk pasteurization. Environment and Agriculture Tue 1/25 10:30 AM LOB Room 301-303 This bill allows for the sale of products made with raw milk in certain circumstances.
Support HB1412 relative to gardening, homesteading, and organic food production. Environment and Agriculture Tue 1/25 11:00 AM LOB Room 301-303 This bill provides that any person may cultivate vegetable gardens on their own property, or on the private property of another with the permission of the owner. This bill also adds a deduction from business profits and a credit against the business profits tax paid in the amount of the USDA Organic Certification fee.
Oppose HB1587 relative to determination of average final compensation under the retirement system and making an appropriation therefor. Executive Departments and Administration Tue 1/25 10:00 AM LOB Room 302-304 This bill modifies the calculation of compensation paid in excess of the full base rate of compensation under the definition of average final compensation in the retirement system for persons hired after July 1, 2011. The actuarial cost of the change is funded from general funds of the current biennium.
Of Interest SB387 making an appropriation to the body-worn and dashboard camera fund. Finance Tue 1/25 1:00 PM SH Room 103 This bill makes an appropriation to the body-worn and dashboard camera fund and establishes a distribution process.
Of Interest HB1662 related to privacy obligations of the department of health and human services. Health, Human Services and Elderly Affairs Tue 1/25 11:00 AM LOB Room 210-211 This bill establishes a data privacy and information technology security governance board within the department of health and human services to oversee data privacy risk calculation and risk mitigation efforts, as well as provides for 2 employees within the department to accomplish these objectives.
Support HB1619 relative to qualifying conditions for the therapeutic cannabis program. Health, Human Services and Elderly Affairs Tue 1/25 1:00 PM LOB Room 210-211 This bill adds moderate to severe chronic migraine headaches to the qualifying conditions for the therapeutic cannabis program.
Support HB1455 relative to state enforcement of federal vaccination mandates. Health, Human Services and Elderly Affairs Tue 1/25 3:30 PM LOB Room 210-211 This bill prohibits state enforcement of any federal law, order, or rule that requires an individual, as a condition of employment or any other activity, to provide proof of vaccination against COVID-19 or to submit more than once per month to COVID-19 testing.
Oppose SB344 relative to the quorum requirements under the right to know law of meetings open to the public. Judiciary Tue 1/25 2:00 PM SH Room 100 This bill removes the physical presence quorum requirement for meetings under RSA 91-A.
Oppose HB1250 requiring the public utilities commission to consider climate change in making rate-setting decisions. Science, Technology and Energy Tue 1/25 1:30 PM LOB Room 306-308 This bill requires the public utilities commission to consider climate change when setting rates, fees, or charges.
Of Interest HB1024 relative to local speed limits in business or urban residence districts. Transportation Tue 1/25 10:30 AM LOB Room 201-203 This bill lowers the possible speed limit for local alterations for speeds limits in business or urban residence districts.
Support HB1138 exempting the display of a front license plate on certain vehicles. Transportation Tue 1/25 11:00 AM LOB Room 201-203 This bill allows for an application and payment of a fee to exempt the display of a front license plate on certain vehicles.
Support HB1150 relative to temporary license plates. Transportation Tue 1/25 11:30 AM LOB Room 201-203 This bill permits any New Hampshire resident who purchases a motor vehicle from another individual to display an existing valid New Hampshire license plate registered in their name for a period of 5 days from the date of sale.
Oppose SB449 relative to the retention of social security numbers by the division of motor vehicles. Transportation Tue 1/25 1:40 PM LOB Room 101 This bill gives an applicant for a driver’s license the opportunity to determine whether to have his or her complete social security number, or only the last 5 digits, retained in the records of the department of safety. This bill also permits the department to transmit the last 4 digits of an individual’s social security number to the department of state for voter identification purposes.
Support HB1445 relative to the identification of police vehicles. Transportation Tue 1/25 2:30 PM LOB Room 201-203 This bill requires certain law enforcement vehicles to display the agency name, law enforcement license plates, and emergency lights when being used for a valid law enforcement function.
Support HB1636 relative to prohibitions on carrying a loaded firearm on an OHRV or snowmobile. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Wed 1/26 9:00 AM SH Room Reps Hall This bill creates an exception to the prohibition on carrying a loaded firearm on an OHRV or snowmobile for any person carrying a pistol or revolver who is not prohibited from possessing a firearm by a New Hampshire statute.
Oppose HB1668 requiring a background check prior to any commercial firearm sale. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Wed 1/26 9:45 AM SH Room Reps Hall This bill requires commercial firearms sales or transfers in this state to be subject to a criminal background check and provides a criminal penalty for a violation. The bill excludes private, noncommercial sales or transfers between individuals, provided neither individual is prohibited from owning or possessing a firearm under state or federal law.
Oppose HB1310 prohibiting the discharge of a firearm in the direction of a building, livestock, or pets. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Wed 1/26 10:30 AM SH Room Reps Hall This bill prohibits the discharge of a firearm in the direction of a building, livestock, or pets that are within eyesight of the person discharging the firearm while hunting.
Support HB1178 prohibiting the state from enforcing any federal statute, regulation, or Presidential Executive Order that restricts or regulates the right of the people to keep and bear arms. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Wed 1/26 11:30 AM SH Room Reps Hall This bill prohibits the state of New Hampshire, a political subdivision of this state, or any person acting under the color of state, county, or municipal law from using any personnel or financial resources to enforce, administer, or cooperate with any law, act, rule, order, or regulation of the United States Government or Executive Order of the President of the United States that is inconsistent with any law of this state regarding the regulation of firearms, ammunition, magazines or the ammunition feeding devices, firearm components, firearms supplies, or knives.
Oppose HB1151 prohibiting the display of a deadly weapon at a parade, funeral procession, picket line, march, rally, vigil, or demonstration. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Wed 1/26 1:30 PM SH Room Reps Hall This bill prohibits the open carry or display of a firearm at a parade funeral procession, picket line, march, rally, vigil, demonstration, or other similar event.
Oppose HB1096 prohibiting open carrying or display of a deadly weapon within 100 feet of a polling place. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Wed 1/26 2:15 PM SH Room Reps Hall This bill prohibits the open carrying or display of a deadly weapon within 100 feet of a polling place.
Support HB1281 relative to access to firearms confiscated from a person who is subject to a protective order. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Wed 1/26 3:15 PM SH Room Reps Hall This bill authorizes a person other than a peace officer to store or dispose of weapons for a person subject to a protective order requiring them to relinquish such weapons.
Support HB1132 relative to applications for a charter conversion school. Education Wed 1/26 11:00 AM LOB Room 205-207 This bill removes certain vote requirements for conversion of a public school to a chartered public school and adds the requirement for a majority vote of the school district at a regular annual meeting or special meeting.
Oppose SB403 re-establishing the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Farmers Market Nutrition Program. Health and Human Services Wed 1/26 9:15 AM LOB Room 101 This bill re-establishes the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) Farmers Market Nutrition Program.
Oppose SB404 establishing a supplemental nutrition assistance program. Health and Human Services Wed 1/26 9:30 AM LOB Room 101 This bill establishes a supplemental nutrition assistance program outreach program.
Oppose SB414 relative to respite care services for persons caring for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders, and making an appropriation therefor. Health and Human Services Wed 1/26 10:00 AM LOB Room 101 This bill revises the definition of ADRD, Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders, and makes a $1 appropriation to the department of health and human services for respite care services for persons caring for individuals with ADRD.
Oppose HB1260 making immunization status a protected class. Judiciary Wed 1/26 9:00 AM LOB Room 206-208 This bill makes immunization status a protected class.
Oppose HB1490 relative to equal access to places of public accommodation regardless of vaccination status. Judiciary Wed 1/26 10:30 AM LOB Room 206-208 This bill provides that an individual shall not be denied access to places of public accommodation based on vaccination status or the decision not to use a medical device.
Oppose HB1316 directing the director of the state police to develop requirements for eFoil and electric hydrofoil surfboard watercraft. Resources, Recreation and Development Wed 1/26 9:00 AM LOB Room 305-307 This bill directs the director of the state police to make rules relative to safety requirements for eFoil and electric hydrofoil surfboard watercraft.
Oppose HB1641 relative to vessel registration fees. Resources, Recreation and Development Wed 1/26 11:15 AM LOB Room 305-307 This bill changes the way vessel registration fees are computed.
Of Interest HB1227 relative to the definition of prime wetland. Resources, Recreation and Development Wed 1/26 1:00 PM LOB Room 305-307 This bill further defines prime wetland for local protection in fill and dredge permits.
Oppose HB1498 establishing a safety program for off highway recreational vehicles and snowmobiles. Resources, Recreation and Development Wed 1/26 2:45 PM LOB Room 305-307 This bill implements a safety training program for OHRV and snowmobile operation.
Of Interest HB1440 relative to surface water quality standards for perfluorinated chemicals. Resources, Recreation and Development Wed 1/26 3:30 PM LOB Room 305-307 This bill requires the department of environmental services to make rules about perfluorinated chemical limits in surface waters.
Oppose SB441 relative to the municipal share of fines for motor vehicle speeding offenses. Ways and Means Wed 1/26 9:15 AM SH Room 100 This bill provides for municipalities to receive a portion of fines collected for motor vehicle offenses.
Oppose SB428 establishing a scholarship fund for certain small businesses applying for loans from the capital access program administered by the New Hampshire business finance authority. Commerce Thu 1/27 1:30 PM SH Room 100 This bill establishes a scholarship fund in the capital access program of the business finance authority to cover entry costs for socially and/or economically disadvantaged individual small business owners applying for loans from the program.
Oppose SB451 establishing a New Hampshire innovation program in the department of business and economic affairs and making an annual appropriation therefor. Commerce Thu 1/27 1:45 PM SH Room 100 This bill establishes the New Hampshire innovation program and the New Hampshire innovation fund in the department of business and economic affairs. The purpose of the program is to increase funding for research and development intensive start-up companies located in New Hampshire. The bill also makes an annual appropriation of $5,000,000 to the fund.
Support HB1613 establishing a limited farmers liquor manufacturer license. Commerce and Consumer Affairs Thu 1/27 10:30 AM LOB Room 302-304 This bill establishes a limited farmers liquor manufacturer license.
Support HB1556 relative to on-premise and off-premise sales at a beverage manufacturer’s facility. Commerce and Consumer Affairs Thu 1/27 11:00 AM LOB Room 302-304 This bill allows consumers purchasing beverage samples to drink to also purchase beverages for consumption off premise at the same point of sale in the licensee’s facility.
Of Interest HB1595 relative to establishing a statewide food truck license. Commerce and Consumer Affairs Thu 1/27 1:15 PM LOB Room 302-304 This bill establishes a statewide food truck license.
Oppose HB1131 relative to facial covering policies for schools. Education Thu 1/27 10:30 AM LOB Room 205-207 This bill prohibits school boards and accredited nonpublic schools from adopting, enforcing, or implementing a policy that requires students or members of the public to wear a facial covering.
Support HB1371 relative to school district policies on facial masks of students in schools. Education Thu 1/27 11:15 AM LOB Room 205-207 This bill requires school districts to adopt a policy leaving facial mask use to parents of students and not tolerating bullying, harassment, or discrimination.
Of Interest HB1373 relative to the best interest of the student for a change of school or assignment. Education Thu 1/27 1:00 PM LOB Room 205-207 This bill allows for the consideration of parental concerns in the request for a change of school or assignment of a student.
Of Interest HB1672 relative to misuse of education freedom account funds. Education Thu 1/27 1:30 PM LOB Room 205-207 This bill requires the transfer of funds from terminated education freedom accounts to the education trust fund, requires investigation of and ineligibility for misuse of funds, and requires the department of education adopt the rules on policies and procedures for administration of the program.
Of Interest HB1679 relative to the dissolution and repeal of cooperative school districts. Education Thu 1/27 2:45 PM LOB Room 205-207 This bill requires cooperative school districts to review and adopt dissolution plans prior to January 1, 2024, and repeals authority for all cooperative school districts on June 30, 2025.
Oppose SB446 establishing a child care workforce fund and grant program and making an appropriation therefor. Health and Human Services Thu 1/27 10:15 AM LOB Room 101 This bill establishes a child care workforce fund to provide grants to eligible child care programs for child care workforce recruitment and retention bonuses and benefits. The bill makes an appropriation to the fund for the purpose of establishing and administering the grant program.
Of Interest HB1597 permitting arraignments for felonies and preliminary examinations to be heard in circuit court. Judiciary Thu 1/27 9:00 AM LOB Room 206-208 This bill permits arraignments for felonies and preliminary examinations to be heard in circuit court.
Oppose HB1014 allowing public meetings to be conducted virtually. Judiciary Thu 1/27 11:00 AM LOB Room 206-208 This bill establishes requirements for remote access to public meetings under RSA 91-A, the right-to-know law.
Oppose HB1088 relative to employee protections from COVID-19 in the workplace. Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitative Services Thu 1/27 10:30 AM SH Room Reps Hall This bill establishes COVID-19 related workplace rights for employees.
Oppose HB1210 relative to exemptions from vaccine mandates. Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitative Services Thu 1/27 11:15 AM SH Room Reps Hall This bill directs a private employer, postsecondary institution, or clinical site for educational programs to accept requests from employees or students for exemptions from vaccine mandates. The bill also prohibits an employer from requiring any medical treatment that has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration only for emergency or experimental use.
Of Interest HB1351 prohibiting certain employers from requiring a COVID-19 vaccination as a condition of employment. Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitative Services Thu 1/27 11:45 AM SH Room Reps Hall This bill prohibits an employer from requiring an employee to receive the COVID-19 vaccination as a condition of employment.
Oppose HB1352 relative to eligibility for workers’ compensation for an adverse reaction to a mandatory COVID-19 vaccination. Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitative Services Thu 1/27 1:00 PM SH Room Reps Hall This bill provides that an adverse reaction to an employer-mandated COVID-19 vaccination shall be deemed to be an occupational disease for the purpose of determining eligibility for workers’ compensation.
Oppose HB1358 requiring public and private employers to establish procedures and exceptions for the use of mandatory intrusive testing as a condition of new or continued employment. Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitative Services Thu 1/27 1:45 PM SH Room Reps Hall This bill requires any public or private employer in the state to allow an employee an exemption from intrusive testing requirements.
Of Interest HB1377 relative to unemployment benefits for employees terminated for refusing to comply with a vaccine mandate. Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitative Services Thu 1/27 2:30 PM SH Room Reps Hall This bill establishes rights for employees for noncompliance with an employer-required vaccination mandate.
Oppose HB1538 requiring prevailing wages on state-funded public works projects. Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitative Services Thu 1/27 3:30 PM SH Room Reps Hall This bill requires certain workers employed in the construction of public works in the state of New Hampshire to be paid the prevailing minimum hourly wage and benefits.
Oppose HB1656 establishing a road usage registration fee and making an appropriation therefor. Public Works and Highways Thu 1/27 10:30 AM LOB Room 201-203 This bill provides for an annual adjustment to motor vehicle registration fees to take into account gross vehicle weight and vehicle miles traveled, and directs the department of transportation to use part of the funds generated through vehicle registration for implementation of Type II noise abatement projects.
Support HB1468 relative to the legalization of cannabis. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Fri 1/28 9:00 AM LOB Room 202-204 This bill legalizes the possession and use of cannabis for persons 18 years of age or older.
Support HB1175 relative to recording interactions with public officials. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Fri 1/28 9:45 AM LOB Room 202-204 This bill allows for a person to record interactions with public officials during the performance of their duties.
Oppose HB1433 relative to penalties for poisoning dogs. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Fri 1/28 1:15 PM LOB Room 202-204 This bill includes poisoning as a type of cruelty to animals and makes it a felony to purposely poison an animal.

The post Bill Hearings for Week of January 24, 2022 appeared first on NH Liberty Alliance.

Full Video from Historic Hearing on CACR 32, the NH Exit Constitutional Amendment

Free Keene - Sun, 2022-01-23 01:45 +0000

It was standing-room-only this Thursday afternoon as the state house Federal Relations committee held a historic hearing on CACR 32, likely the first-ever proposed constitutional amendment to peacefully declare independence from the United States.  Freedom-loving activists packed the large-sized room, nearly forcing the hearing into Rep’s Hall, which can hold four hundred.  Many people testified in favor of the bill and with the exception of a few Empire Loyalist state reps who spoke against it, everyone else who spoke was in favor of it, except for one guy.  I was able to get independent video of the entire three-hour hearing as well as the press conference prior to it.  Thank you to everyone who turned out.

Here’s the full hearing video:

Here’s the press conference prior to the hearing:

Unfortunately, the committee voted 21-0 against the proposed amendment. NHexit.US has the full story and video of the committee’s discussion and vote.

Cowardly State Reps Vote 21-0 Against NHexit Amendment CACR 32

NHexit.US - Sat, 2022-01-22 19:25 +0000

Supporters of NH independence packed the public hearing this week for CACR 32, the historic constitutional amendment that would allow voters to decide to secede peacefully from the United States. The next morning, the Federal Relations committee had their “executive session” on the bill and after some discussion of how truly ignorant and cowardly they all are, they voted 21-0 to recommend the bill be killed. Here’s the video including the committee’s vote and prior discussion:

They gobbled up the lies from Rep Brodie Deshaies who suggested to the reps that they could be removed from office for “rebellion” if they supported this measure. He suggested it would violate their oath of allegiance to the United States, even though the US has violated its own constitution plenty of times and the bill would merely give the people of NH the opportunity to vote.

A rep who supports the empire could still have voted for this bill, simply to let the people decide. However all of the cowards on this committee refused to support your right to vote on the question. They think they know what is best. Why are they so afraid of letting people have their say? If the people of NH support the US empire, they would surely vote to stay, so why not put it to a vote?

Empire Loyalist Brodie Deshaies, the lying Republican state rep from Wolfeboro. Rated a “C” by the New Hampshire Liberty Alliance

From the discussion it was clear that they hadn’t even read or understood the simple, two sentence amendment. Some reps complained that the amendment contradicted the seventh article of the NH constitution’s bill of rights, since it mentions some rights delegated to the United States. However, the final sentence of CACR 32’s blissfully short amendment clearly says all other references to the US are nullified:

“Are you in favor of amending the first part of the constitution by inserting after article 7 a new article to read as follows:

[Art.] 7-a. [Independent Nation.] New Hampshire peaceably declares independence from the United States and immediately proceeds as a sovereign nation. All other references to the United States in this constitution, state statutes and regulations are nullified.”

Other objections from the committee were of the typical sort. Some wanted “a plan”, others want “free” health care from the feds. What about taking care of elderly people? All of their concerns were addressed by the various speakers during the hearing on the bill – watch the full hearing here – but it appears not a single one of the reps listened. Some just called us crazy.

Even Rep Susan DeLemus, whose husband was wrongfully imprisoned by the feds for five years, who had told the President of the Foundation for NH Independence that she would vote for the bill, voted against it.

Despite this setback, the full house of 400 reps will have to vote on CACR 32 via a “roll call” and so they will all be on the record. Do they support allowing the people to have a say on the future of their freedom, or not? Stay tuned to NHexit.US for the latest.

Psilocybin Mushroom Decriminalization Bill to Have Second Hearing

Free Keene - Thu, 2022-01-20 04:28 +0000

Liberty Cap Mushrooms

HB 1349 is a bill that would decriminalize psilocybin mushrooms sponsored by Amherst Representative Tony Labranche. The bill had its first hearing in the Criminal Justice committee on January 11th, but while all the other bills heard that day got voted on, HB 1349 had a new hearing date scheduled. That means you have another chance to go and show your support for the bill on Thursday, January 20, 2022 in the Legislative Office Building in Concord at 9am. Alternatively, if you can’t make it you can email the committee and tell them to vote Ought To Pass.

The bill is very interesting because it is modeled word for word after the bill that decriminalized marijuana in New Hampshire. What argument does a member of this committee have against this bill? Psilocybin mushrooms are even safer for people and society than marijuana, according to Dr. David Nutt, former chairman of the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs in the UK.

I spoke at the hearing on January 11th and so did 4 others. The only person who spoke against this bill was a police lieutenant. How typical. The only person who didn’t want to see Granite Staters gain more freedom was a person who personally profits from the war on drugs.

The New Hampshire Supreme Court already decided that psilocybin use was constitutionally protected if you’re using it for religious practice or to worship god. My spiritual beliefs include worshiping the god in myself by allowing myself the ability to ascend beyond what and who I am now. Psilocybin is a great tool to do that and more people experiencing this medicine would help heal our community which is in part damaged by the war on drugs.

The bill: http://www.gencourt.state.nh.us/lsr_search/billText.aspx?id=1711&type=4

If would like to contact the committee hearing this bill use this email: HouseCriminalJusticeandPublicSafety@leg.state.nh.us

The Most Important Date Of The Decade Is Upon Us: A Hearing On New Hampshire Independence Is Here

Free Keene - Mon, 2022-01-17 04:41 +0000

The BIGGEST most important date (Jan 20th) of the decade for freedom may just be upon us so mark your calendar and come support the New Hampshire independence rally & public hearing this Thursday ! Don’t be the reason we’re stuck without options- freedom loving people unite- lets create a home and free place to live and give our kids a bastion of hope for the future.

If New Hampshire voters say yes to independence it will separate New Hampshire from the US empire and immediately halt the abuse by Washington DC. What we can accomplish by ourselves will be far greater than anything we can accomplish under the threat of Washington politicians. Independence will offer New Hampshire citizens many things- everything from a reduced tax burden and economic growth to reducing the staggering amount of regulatory barriers placed on New Hampshire businesses. Unhappy with forced vaccination? We can fix that! If we’re independent the feds can’t dictate what should be a matter between us and our doctors. Don’t like Washington’s gun regulations? We can go farther at eliminating arguably unconstitutional restrictions. Unhappy about our schools? Without DC bribing our politicians to pass laws we otherwise wouldn’t and they can’t pass directly we can fix our schools.

When all else fails, what is the plan New Hampshire? 71% (78% at its height) of Union Leader readers said YES to a vote on independence! Now we need to get the legislators to put it on the ballot so the voters can actually decide to declare independence from Washington DC. This New Hampshire constitutional amendment will do just that.

For those not aware New Hampshire’s constitution pre-dates that of the United States and should we choose to do so we can leave the union and divorce DC. We can lead the US just as our forefathers did before us during the Revolutionary War. Just as they declared independence from Great Britain we too can declare independence from the new empire.

However unlike that insurrection this isn’t a declaration of war. This is a means of declaration via proper legal channels- and that’s something even the US courts have acknowledged. Where some would lead you to believe that independence is illegal or that it’s impossible the truth is that even the courts have ruled that the procedure rather than the declaration itself has in prior instances been improper.

Let’s keep our options open and support CACR 32 by joining together with democrats, conservatives, and other independent voters this Thursday Jan 20th, 2022:

Address: 33 N State Street, Concord, New Hampshire
Time: Rally starts at 2:00 pm, press conference @ 3:00, and the public hearing is at 3:30 Room LB 206.

Can’t make it? See our directions below for how you can testify electronically.

For more details read the latest article by Liberty Block:

Breaking: NH Exit Legislation Assigned House Committee & Hearing

Want to express support for the constitutional amendment on New Hampshire independence? Here is how to testify (in other words inform the committee on your thoughts) electronically on what you think of this important legislation.

Can’t Make It? Here is how to testify electronically via email

Step 1: Open the link here http://gencourt.state.nh.us/house/committees/remotetestimony/default.aspx?mc_cid=0cc3e8800e&mc_eid=6d8bda0b1a

Step 2: Select January 20th on the calendar shown

Step 3: Under Select the Committee find House State-Federal Relations and Veterans Affairs

Step 4: Under Choose the Bill find 3:30 pm – CACR32

Step 5: Under I am select A Member of the Public

Step 6: Under I’m Representing leave Myself

Step 7: Select the bubble I Support this Bill

Step 8: Click Continue

Step 9: Enter your First and Last name, Town, State, and an email address.

Step 10: Click the Continue button

Step 11: Check the box that says “By clicking this checkbox, you agree that the information you have provided is truthful to the best of your knowledge.”

Step 12: Click the Continue button

You’ve now registered your support for giving voters of New Hampshire the opportunity to vote for independence from Washington DC.

The next thing to do is send the Committee your thoughts and comments in why they should support democracy and give the people the chance to vote on this very important constitutional amendment.

Please email written testimony to: HouseState-FederalRelationsandVeteransAffairs@leg.state.nh.us

It’s currently unclear if the hearing will be live streamed by the state itself or not, as nothing is shown under scheduled live streams as I write this, but this may change, and we will certainly be posting a video of the hearing afterward on just what happened so stay tuned in to Free Keene for updates. Here is a link to the live streams just in case you are able to watch it live via the state’s cameras:

https://www.youtube.com/c/NHHouseofRepresentativesCommitteeStreaming/videos?view=2&live_view=502

NH National Anthem to be Sung at Rally Prior to Independence Bill Public Hearing on Jan 20th

NHexit.US - Mon, 2022-01-17 03:14 +0000
NH National Anthem, “Live Free or Die”

By now, you may already know about the historic, first-ever public hearing on NH independence constitutional amendment CACR 32 happening this Thursday, January 20th at 3:30pm in room 206 of the Legislative Office Building in Concord, NH. However, you may not know that there is a rally happening prior to the hearing, starting at 2pm in front of the LOB at 33 N State St. Supporters of NH Exit will be gathering to hold signs, NH flags, network, listen to speakers, and join in singing the New Hampshire National Anthem!

What is the NH National Anthem? Back in the 70s, a previous governor, Meldrim Thompson Jr., released a very catchy little tune during his campaign called “Live Free or Die”. It recently resurfaced in the NH liberty community and with a little tweaking, the song has been reworked now as the NH National Anthem! You can download the songsheet graphic and read the words here. Thanks to NH native Bill Barger for the excellent graphic design.

In addition to the rally at 2pm, just before the hearing we’ll hold a press conference in the lobby of of Legislative Office Building starting at 3pm. It will feature, at minimum, CACR 32 bill sponsor Rep. Mike Sylvia of Belmont and the president of the Foundation for NH Independence, Alu Axelman.

Dress warm, bring your friends and NH flags and any pro-secession signage and join us this Thursday afternoon at 33 N State St. in Concord starting at 2pm! Whether you can or can’t attend, please read this post to learn the steps you can take to help us get this constitutional amendment passed!

Bill Hearings for Week of January 17, 2022

N.H. Liberty Alliance - Sun, 2022-01-16 20:36 +0000
  • These are the most liberty-critical hearings for the week
  • Click on the bill number to read the bill.
  • Click on the committee name to email the committee your thoughts.

Of the 207 hearings in the House, we are recommending support of 21 and opposition of 29 with 33 being of interest.
Of the 54 hearings in the Senate, we are recommending support of 4 and opposition of 4 with 5 being of interest.

Position Bill Title Committee Day Time Room State Analysis
Of Interest HB1436 relative to appeals of family court decisions. Children and Family Law Tue 1/18 10:30 AM LOB Room 206-208 This bill establishes the right to a de novo appeal to the superior court for family court decisions.
Of Interest HB1265 relative to a judge’s discretion to set aside rules in family court proceedings. Children and Family Law Tue 1/18 11:00 AM LOB Room 206-208 This bill prohibits a judge from waiving a family court rule, except for rules relating to fees.
Of Interest HB1142 relative to the right to submit evidence and testimony in family court proceedings. Children and Family Law Tue 1/18 11:30 AM LOB Room 206-208 This bill provides that parties in a family court proceeding shall have the right to present evidence and testimony.
Of Interest HB1551 relative to the right of a party in a family court case to create their own written transcripts of court proceedings. Children and Family Law Tue 1/18 1:00 PM LOB Room 206-208 This bill establishes the right of parties in family court proceedings to create their own written transcripts of court proceedings and to submit those transcripts to the appellate court.
Of Interest HB1550 relative to the right of children and teenagers to testify in family court proceedings. Children and Family Law Tue 1/18 1:30 PM LOB Room 206-208 This bill requires the court to allow a child 12 years of age or older to testify in a family court proceeding and permits a child under 12 years of age to testify at the judge’s discretion.
Of Interest HB1511 relative to submitting officially authorized recordings of hearings for appeal of family court decisions. Children and Family Law Tue 1/18 2:00 PM LOB Room 206-208 This bill allows for parties in a family court proceeding to submit officially authorized recordings of hearings for appeal of family court decisions.
Support HB1253 relative to the choice of counselor to evaluate a child in family court proceedings. Children and Family Law Tue 1/18 3:00 PM LOB Room 206-208 This bill allows for parents to choose their counselor for counseling that is part of the parenting plan issued in a court order, as well as in any other counseling used in family court to evaluate a child. This bill also requires courts to select counselors that are participating providers in the parties’ insurance networks.
Oppose SB331 relative to waivers of deductibles in automobile insurance policies. Commerce Tue 1/18 9:30 AM SH Room 100 This bill requires any automobile insurance policy that contains coverage for physical damage by reason of collision to waive any deductible of such coverage when the damage is caused by any motor vehicle if the operator of such vehicle has been positively identified and is solely at fault.
Oppose SB347 relative to the use of protected health information by employers. Commerce Tue 1/18 9:45 AM SH Room 100 This bill prohibits an employer from inquiring, either verbally or in writing, about an employee’s protected health information as a requirement for initial or continued employment.
Oppose HB1564 requiring school districts to provide breakfast for students. Education Tue 1/18 10:30 AM LOB Room 205-207 This bill requires school districts to provide breakfast to students through the National School Breakfast Program or through a program of its own.
Of Interest HB1627 establishing an education freedom account program administrator in the department of education and making an appropriation therefor. Education Tue 1/18 11:15 AM LOB Room 205-207 This bill establishes the position of education freedom account administrator in the department of education, division of learner support, and makes an appropriation to the department for the position.
Oppose HB1630 requiring high school students to complete a half year required course in the introduction to philosophy. Education Tue 1/18 1:00 PM LOB Room 205-207 This bill establishes a requirement for high school students to have a course in the introduction to philosophy.
Of Interest HB1367 relative to civics instruction in schools. Education Tue 1/18 2:30 PM LOB Room 205-207 This bill requires a competency assessment in government and civics instruction in schools. The bill modifies the provisions enacted in 2021, 157 effective July 1, 2023.
Of Interest HB1533 relative to health education curriculum in schools. Education Tue 1/18 3:00 PM LOB Room 205-207 This bill requires that health education instruction in schools include the meaning of consent, respect for personal boundaries, and sexual violence prevention.
Of Interest HB1144 requiring public schools to teach labor history. Education Tue 1/18 3:45 PM LOB Room 205-207 This bill requires middle schools and high schools to include instruction on United States and New Hampshire labor history.
Oppose HB1121 relative to new solid waste sites. Environment and Agriculture Tue 1/18 9:30 AM LOB Room 301-303 This bill requires an applicant for a new solid waste landfill to provide proof of insurance and obtain a surety bond against all damages.
Oppose HB1420 prohibiting the issuance of new landfill permits until the state’s solid waste plan is updated. Environment and Agriculture Tue 1/18 10:45 AM LOB Room 301-303 This bill prohibits the issuance of new landfill permits under the state’s solid waste plan is updated.
Of Interest HB1454 relative to permits for the siting of new landfills. Environment and Agriculture Tue 1/18 1:00 PM LOB Room 301-303 This bill prohibits the siting of landfills within a proscribed distance of groundwater sources.
Oppose HB1652 relative to the recycling of beverage containers. Environment and Agriculture Tue 1/18 2:30 PM LOB Room 301-303 This bill establishes the beverage container deposit recycling program and directs the proceeds of such program to the general fund and to the state recycling fund.
Oppose HB1444 relative to the registration of medical spas. Executive Departments and Administration Tue 1/18 1:00 PM LOB Room 302-304 This bill establishes the registration of medical spa facilities.
Oppose HB1429 establishing licensure for massage establishments. Executive Departments and Administration Tue 1/18 2:00 PM LOB Room 302-304 This bill establishes licensure for massage establishments.
Support SB274 relative to governmental construction contracts. Finance Tue 1/18 1:20 PM SH Room 103 This bill removes labor agreements from the competitive bid process and awarding of state government and state government assisted construction contracts.
Support HB1045 requiring legislative oversight over the emergency powers of the department of health and human services. Health, Human Services and Elderly Affairs Tue 1/18 11:00 AM LOB Room 210-211 This bill clarifies certain public health emergency management powers of the department of health and human services.
Of Interest HB1345 relative to the release of a teenager’s medical records to a parent or guardian. Health, Human Services and Elderly Affairs Tue 1/18 11:30 AM LOB Room 210-211 This bill provides for the release of a minor’s medical records to the parent or guardian unless the parent or guardian’s consent is not required for the medical treatment or the health care provider reasonably believes that there is possibility of abuse and release of the record may endanger the minor.
Support HB1022 permitting pharmacists to dispense the drug ivermectin by means of a standing order. Health, Human Services and Elderly Affairs Tue 1/18 2:00 PM LOB Room 210-211 This bill allows pharmacists to dispense invermectin pursuant to a standing order entered into by licensed health care providers.
Of Interest HB1369 relative to COVID-19 health and safety policies at New Hampshire performing arts venues. Health, Human Services and Elderly Affairs Tue 1/18 2:45 PM LOB Room 210-211 This bill provides that performing arts venues in New Hampshire have the authority to establish their own COVID health and safety policies.
Oppose SB300 relative to the state commission for human rights. Judiciary Tue 1/18 1:00 PM SH Room 100 This bill defines and includes the refusal of an experimental drug in the protections provided under the state commission for human rights.
Support SB393 relative to the use of restraints on pregnant women in the custody of a state or county correctional facility. Judiciary Tue 1/18 2:00 PM SH Room 100 This bill establishes procedures for the use of restraints on pregnant women in county or state correctional custody.
Of Interest SB431 relative to child support in cases with equal or approximately equal parenting schedules. Judiciary Tue 1/18 2:15 PM SH Room 100 This bill establishes methods for adjustment of child support for equal or approximately equal parenting residential responsibilities.
Oppose SB294 relative to the release of a defendant pending trial. Judiciary Tue 1/18 2:30 PM SH Room 100 This bill amends the statute governing bail and pre-trial release to include provisions for pre-trial detention for commission of certain offenses that would create a presumption that the defendant is a danger to the public.
Oppose HB1615 relative to driver education and the driver training fund. Transportation Tue 1/18 10:30 AM LOB Room 201-203 This bill directs the department of safety to distribute $250 to approved driving schools for each pupil who completes the driver education program in the prior 3 months.
Support HB1208 relative to driver education. Transportation Tue 1/18 11:00 AM LOB Room 201-203 This bill authorizes a waiver of the driver education requirement if a father, mother, guardian, or other responsible adult provides equivalent classroom instruction and behind the wheel training.
Oppose SB378 relative to the disposal of highway or turnpike funded real estate. Transportation Tue 1/18 1:00 PM LOB Room 101 This bill creates an exception for the disposal of highway or turnpike funded real estate under fair market value for the preservation of public interest.
Of Interest HB1110 relative to windshield tint waivers. Transportation Tue 1/18 3:00 PM LOB Room 201-203 This bill increases the required light transmittance of after market tinted windshields.
Of Interest HB1469 prohibiting banks or businesses from using social credit scores. Commerce and Consumer Affairs Wed 1/19 9:00 AM LOB Room 302-304 This bill prohibits banks and other financial institutions from engaging in discriminatory practices.
Support HB1237 relative to cigar bars. Commerce and Consumer Affairs Wed 1/19 9:45 AM LOB Room 302-304 This bill lowers the amount of revenue from cigars required of cigar bars for 2 years.
Of Interest HB1591 eliminating the enforcement division of the liquor commission. Commerce and Consumer Affairs Wed 1/19 10:15 AM LOB Room 302-304 This bill eliminates the enforcement division of the liquor commission.
Oppose HB1523 establishing a New Hampshire child care fund. Commerce and Consumer Affairs Wed 1/19 1:15 PM LOB Room 302-304 This bill establishes the New Hampshire child care fund and its operational requirements under the department of health and human services.
Of Interest HB1589 prohibiting the sale of products containing intentionally-added PFAS. Commerce and Consumer Affairs Wed 1/19 2:00 PM LOB Room 302-304 This bill prohibiting the sale of products containing intentionally-added PFAS.
Of Interest HB1622 relative to mental health parity. Commerce and Consumer Affairs Wed 1/19 2:45 PM LOB Room 302-304 This bill requires the insurance department to investigate whether certain insurance carrier conduct violates the federal Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act. The bill also requires that insurance reimbursement rates for behavioral health services be no less extensive than any other type of health care services provided to treat physical illness.
Of Interest HB1027 establishing the crime of undermining legislative process by false claim of emergency. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Wed 1/19 9:00 AM LOB Room 202-204 This bill establishes the crime of subversion of the legislative process-treason for any act to subvert the legislative process based on a false claim of emergency caused by COVID-19.
Oppose HB1025 relative to impeding, provoking, or harassing law enforcement officers. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Wed 1/19 9:45 AM LOB Room 202-204 This bill makes it a misdemeanor to impede, provoke, or harass a law enforcement officer.
Oppose HB1117 relative to the circumstances constituting criminal threatening. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Wed 1/19 10:30 AM LOB Room 202-204 This bill adds the intent to coerce or terrorize the people of one age, sex, gender identity, sexual orientation, race, creed, color, marital status, familial status, mental or physical disability, religion, or national origin to the criminal threatening statute.
Oppose HB1011 relative to the penalty for criminal mischief. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Wed 1/19 11:15 AM LOB Room 202-204 This bill increases the penalty for criminal mischief for destruction or vandalism of public property.
Oppose HB1017 establishing criminal penalties for harming or threatening to harm an essential worker. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Wed 1/19 12:00 PM LOB Room 202-204 This bill establishes criminal penalties for causing or threatening harm to an essential worker.
Of Interest HB1423 relative to campaign contributions and expenditures, and making an appropriation therefor. Election Law Wed 1/19 10:45 AM LOB Room 306-308 This bill establishes a fund to provide campaign financing for eligible candidates for governor and councilor and makes an appropriation to the fund. Candidates qualify for financing by collecting a requisite number of qualifying contributions, limiting the size of private contributions, and complying with other provisions of the public financing law. The bill also establishes a voter-owned elections commission to administer the fund.
Of Interest HB1542 relative to documentation required to prove a voter’s eligibility to vote. Election Law Wed 1/19 11:00 AM LOB Room 306-308 This bill requires voters to show certain documentation in order to cast a vote.
Of Interest SB362 relative to training as a certified service plumber. Executive Departments and Administration Wed 1/19 9:00 AM SH Room 103 This bill defines “certified service plumber” and directs the mechanical licensing board to adopt administrative rules regulating certified service plumbers.
Support SB330 relative to reciprocal licensing requirements for boards, commissions, and councils administered by the office of professional licensure and certification and establishing registration of paid feeding assistant programs. Executive Departments and Administration Wed 1/19 10:00 AM SH Room 103 This bill clarifies requirements for reciprocal licenses granted by the boards, commissions, and councils administered by the office of professional licensure and certification and establishes registration for paid feeding assistant programs. This bill is a request of the office of professional licensure and certification.
Oppose SB230 relative to the practice of body art. Executive Departments and Administration Wed 1/19 10:20 AM SH Room 103 This bill defines and regulates body art establishments. This bill is a request of the office of professional licensure and certification.
Support SB286 establishing an association health plan pilot program. Health and Human Services Wed 1/19 9:00 AM LOB Room 101 This bill requires the insurance commissioner to establish a pilot program for association health plans.
Oppose SB326 establishing the office of early childhood. Health and Human Services Wed 1/19 9:30 AM LOB Room 101 This bill establishes an office of early childhood to coordinate, consolidate, and integrate early childhood programs.
Support HB1425 relative to the taking of real property by eminent domain. Judiciary Wed 1/19 2:00 PM LOB Room 206-208 This bill modifies the power of the governor and council to take private property during states of emergency and modifies the calculation of compensation paid for such takings.
Oppose HB1291 prohibiting discrimination against tenants holding certain vouchers for purposes of renting dwellings. Judiciary Wed 1/19 1:00 PM LOB Room 206-208 This bill prohibits discrimination against tenants holding certain vouchers for purposes of renting dwellings.
Oppose HB1544 prohibiting the placement of construction and demolition debris in landfills. Judiciary Wed 1/19 3:00 PM LOB Room 206-208 This bill prohibits the placement of construction and demolition debris in landfills and establishes fines for violations.
Oppose HB1007 relative to qualifications for office. Legislative Administration Wed 1/19 9:00 AM LOB Room 301-303 This bill clarifies certain qualifications of elected officials.
Support HB1033 prohibiting recipients of state or local grants or appropriations from using such funds for lobbying. Legislative Administration Wed 1/19 9:30 AM LOB Room 301-303 This bill prohibits the recipient of a grant or appropriation of county, municipal, school district, or village district funds from using such funds to engage in lobbying activities.
Oppose HB1041 extending the public employees labor relations act to employees of the general court and relative to the duties of the joint committee on legislative facilities. Legislative Administration Wed 1/19 10:00 AM LOB Room 301-303 This bill establishes the legislature as a public employer under the public employee labor relations act and establishes procedures for collective bargaining by nonpartisan employees.
Oppose HB1486 relative to an income-based public assistance stipend for legislators. Legislative Administration Wed 1/19 2:30 PM LOB Room 301-303 This bill directs the department of health and human services to determine eligibility for and administer a stipend provided to members of the general court where members receive such stipend from any program for public assistance.
Oppose HB1656 establishing a road usage registration fee and making an appropriation therefor. Public Works and Highways Wed 1/19 10:30 AM LOB Room 201-203 This bill provides for an annual adjustment to motor vehicle registration fees to take into account gross vehicle weight and vehicle miles traveled, and directs the department of transportation to use part of the funds generated through vehicle registration for implementation of Type II noise abatement projects.
Of Interest HB1585 relative to removing the ramp tolls at exit 11 in Hooksett. Public Works and Highways Wed 1/19 11:30 AM LOB Room 201-203 This bill eliminates the ramp tolls on the Everett turnpike in the town of Hooksett.
Oppose HB1675 establishing a surcharge collected through E-Z Pass for electric vehicles as an alternative road toll. Public Works and Highways Wed 1/19 1:15 PM LOB Room 201-203 This bill establishes a surcharge collected through E-Z Pass for electric vehicles as an alternative road toll. The provisions are repealed in 2025.
Support HB1555 repealing the permit required for fires at campgrounds. Resources, Recreation and Development Wed 1/19 9:45 AM LOB Room 305-307 This bill removes the permit requirement for camp fires.
Of Interest HB1167 establishing a maximum contaminant level for perfluorinated chemicals in surface water. Resources, Recreation and Development Wed 1/19 1:45 PM LOB Room 305-307 This bill establishes maximum contaminant levels for perfluorinated chemicals in surface water.
Oppose SB338 enabling municipalities to adopt a municipal occupancy fee. Ways and Means Wed 1/19 9:30 AM SH Room 100 This bill enables a municipality to collect an occupancy fee from room rentals for the purpose of establishing a municipal capital fund, revolving fund, or tourism support fund.
Of Interest SB315 directing that a portion of revenue distributions from the meals and rooms municipal revenue fund be used by municipalities to reduce the local property tax rate. Ways and Means Wed 1/19 9:45 AM SH Room 100 This bill requires that a portion of revenues distributed to municipalities from the meals and rooms municipal revenue fund, which exceed fiscal year 2021 amounts received, shall be used to reduce the local property tax rate.
Support HB1349 decriminalizing the possession and use of psilocybin mushrooms. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Thu 1/20 9:00 AM SH Room Reps Hall This bill decriminalizes the possession or use of a certain amount or psilocybin mushrooms by a person 18 years of age or older.
Of Interest HB1598 legalizing the possession and use of cannabis. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Thu 1/20 9:30 AM SH Room Reps Hall This bill legalizes the possession and use of cannabis for persons 21 years of age and older.
Support CACR20 relating to personal liberty. Providing that adults shall have the right to possess cannabis for personal consumption. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Thu 1/20 2:00 PM SH Room Reps Hall This constitutional amendment concurrent resolution establishes that right for all adults to possess cannabis for personal consumption.
Support CACR34 relating to the use, sale, or cultivation of cannabis. Providing that the state shall make no law prohibiting the use, sale, or cultivation of cannabis for persons over 18 years of age. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Thu 1/20 2:30 PM SH Room Reps Hall This constitutional amendment concurrent resolution prohibits the legislature from making laws that prohibit the use, sale, or cultivation of cannabis for adults.
Support CACR35 relating to cannabis. Providing that all adults have the right to possess, use, and cultivate cannabis, subject to regulation by the legislature. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Thu 1/20 3:00 PM SH Room Reps Hall This constitutional amendment concurrent resolution establishes the right for all adults to possess, use, and cultivate cannabis, subject to further regulation by the legislature.
Of Interest HB1015 relative to school district policies regarding objectionable material. Education Thu 1/20 9:00 AM LOB Room 205-207 This bill revises the requirements for school district policies providing an alternative to specific course material based on a parent or legal guardian’s determination that the material is objectionable.
Of Interest HB1051 relative to state board of education rules for credit for alternative, extended learning, and work-based programs. Education Thu 1/20 10:00 AM LOB Room 205-207 This bill revises rulemaking authority of the state board of education to adopt rules on alternative programs for granting credit to provide for alternative, extended learning, and work-based programs.
Of Interest HB1113 prohibiting the department of education and the state board of education from directing or limiting school instructional options, such as remote learning. Education Thu 1/20 1:45 PM LOB Room 205-207 This bill prohibits the department of education and the state board of education from directing or limiting remote learning options.
Support HB1434 relative to the availability of school curriculum materials. Education Thu 1/20 2:30 PM LOB Room 205-207 This bill requires that curriculum course materials taught to pupils in public schools and public academies be available to the public.
Of Interest HB1567 relative to the removal of election officials from office. Election Law Thu 1/20 9:30 AM LOB Room 306-308 This bill provides that registered voters may remove certain election officials by bringing suit in superior court.
Of Interest HB1457 relative to chain of custody of ballot boxes after an election. Election Law Thu 1/20 11:30 AM LOB Room 306-308 This bill requires that ballot boxes be sent to the secretary of state’s office for storage within 48 hours of an election. This bill also modifies the retention policy for such boxes.
Of Interest HB1522 requiring the use of ballots with embedded security and relative to chain of custody of absentee ballots. Election Law Thu 1/20 1:00 PM LOB Room 306-308 This bill requires that elections are conducted using ballots with embedded security. The bill also specifies the chain of custody for ballots during and after an election.
Oppose SB400 relative to training and procedures for zoning and planning boards and relative to financial investments and incentives for affordable housing development. Election Law and Municipal Affairs Thu 1/20 1:00 PM SH Room 100 This bill makes changes to the training and procedures for zoning and planning boards offered by the office of planning and development. This bill creates incentives and establishes requirements for workforce housing and affordable housing development. The bill also revises the time frames for planning board consideration of applications, and establishes the New Hampshire housing champion certification program.
Of Interest SB239 relative to noncompliance with municipal audit requirements. Election Law and Municipal Affairs Thu 1/20 1:30 PM SH Room 100 This bill requires notification to the department of revenue administration of a completed municipal or county audit and establishes a fine for failure to complete a required audit.
Oppose SB407 relative to expanding Medicaid to include certain postpartum health care services and making an appropriation therefor. Health and Human Services Thu 1/20 10:00 AM LOB Room 101 This bill directs the department of health and human services to submit a state plan amendment to expand postpartum coverage under Medicaid, establishes a quarterly reporting requirement, and makes an appropriation to the department for the purpose of funding the postpartum health care services.
Of Interest SB444 relative to childhood adverse experiences treatment and prevention. Health and Human Services Thu 1/20 10:45 AM LOB Room 101 This bill directs the department of health and human services to establish a pilot program for young children who have experienced adverse childhood events and other emotional trauma and makes an appropriation to the department for this purpose. The bill also makes an appropriation to the department to develop and implement a plan to increase child parent psychotherapy services for young children who have experienced severe emotional trauma.
Support HB1147 relative to governmental records available upon request. Judiciary Thu 1/20 9:00 AM LOB Room 206-208 This bill establishes the right to inspect and make copies of school curricula, reading lists, and student survey dates and questions.
Oppose HB1408 requiring the refund of residential tenancy application fees. Judiciary Thu 1/20 10:30 AM LOB Room 206-208 This bill requires the refund of residential tenancy application fees when an applicant does not become a party to a signed rental agreement.
Support HB1603 defining certain school information as governmental records under the right to know law. Judiciary Thu 1/20 11:15 AM LOB Room 206-208 This bill provides for the inclusion of certain records of schools and school administrative units under the right-to-know law, RSA 91-A.
Support HB1021 prohibiting regulation of religious land use based on the religious nature of the assembly or speech taking place on the land or in the structure. Judiciary Thu 1/20 1:45 PM LOB Room 206-208 This bill prohibits the regulation of religious land use based on the religious nature of the assembly or speech taking place on the land or in the structure.
Of Interest HB1519 defining “religious belief” and protecting it from discrimination. Judiciary Thu 1/20 2:30 PM LOB Room 206-208 This bill defines “religious belief” and protects it from discrimination.
Oppose HB1053 relative to the hourly rate paid to an employee for hours worked but not previously scheduled. Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitative Services Thu 1/20 10:00 AM LOB Room 305-307 This bill requires an employer to pay an hourly rate of time and a half for hours worked by an employee who is called in to work hours not previously scheduled.
Oppose HB1385 prohibiting the use of credit history in employment decisions. Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitative Services Thu 1/20 11:00 AM LOB Room 305-307 This bill prohibits an employer from using an employee’s or prospective employee’s credit history as a criterion for making certain employment decisions.
Oppose HB1251 prohibiting payment of subminimum wages. Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitative Services Thu 1/20 11:30 AM LOB Room 305-307 This bill prohibits the payment of subminimum wages to an employee.
Oppose HB1094 relative to employee work schedules and rest periods. Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitative Services Thu 1/20 1:00 PM LOB Room 305-307 This bill requires employers with 10 or more employees in this state or 2 or more locations in this state to schedule a rest period between certain employment shifts and provide employees with advance notice of the work schedule.
Support HB1081 relative to the dissolution of a village district. Municipal and County Government Thu 1/20 10:30 AM LOB Room 301-303 This bill allows for the dissolution of a village district by a simple majority vote at an annual district meeting.
Support HB1272 limiting the authority of town health officers. Municipal and County Government Thu 1/20 11:30 AM LOB Room 301-303 This bill limits the authority of local health officers in making bylaws or ordinances relating to public health matters.
Support HB1411 relative to transparency of federal agency operations within New Hampshire. State-Federal Relations and Veterans Affairs Thu 1/20 9:00 AM LOB Room 201-203 This bill requires the attorney general to request information from federal agencies operating in New Hampshire and to compile and display such information on a website.
Of Interest CACR32 relating to independence. Providing that the state peaceably declares independence from the United States and proceeds as a sovereign nation. State-Federal Relations and Veterans Affairs Thu 1/20 3:30 PM LOB Room 201-203 This constitutional amendment concurrent resolution declares the state’s independence from the United States and moves New Hampshire forward as a sovereign nation.
Of Interest HB1407 including the promotion of affordable housing under the land and community heritage investment program. Ways and Means Thu 1/20 9:45 AM LOB Room 202-204 This bill includes the promotion of affordable housing under the land and community heritage investment program and requires an annual transfer from the real estate transfer tax revenue to the land and community heritage investment program trust fund.
Oppose HB1478 relative to the business profits tax applicable to certain large, low-wage employers. Ways and Means Thu 1/20 11:15 AM LOB Room 202-204 This bill increases the rate of the business profits tax applicable to business organizations with more than 100 employees who pay wages below a specified amount.
Support HB1176 relative to reducing the penalty for sex work within one’s own home. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Fri 1/21 12:00 PM LOB Room 202-204 This bill establishes a violation-level offense for engaging in sex work in one’s own home.
Support HB1400 prohibiting law enforcement from using the scent of marijuana as probable cause for a search. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Fri 1/21 1:45 PM LOB Room 202-204 This bill prohibits law enforcement from using the scent of marijuana as probable cause for a search.
Oppose HB1283 relative to liability as taxable income of education freedom account payments. Education Fri 1/21 2:00 PM LOB Room 205-207 This bill repeals the statement that education freedom account funds shall not constitute taxable income to the parent of the education freedom account student.
Oppose HB1114 relative to education service providers under the education freedom account program. Education Fri 1/21 3:30 PM LOB Room 205-207 This bill requires education freedom account program scholarship organizations to compile a directory of public profiles for education service providers.
Oppose HB1653 relative to educational and employment opportunities and protections for military families and their dependents. State-Federal Relations and Veterans Affairs Fri 1/21 9:00 AM LOB Room 201-203 This bill: I. Establishes residency and enrollment rights and procedures for military-connected students. II. Provides for temporary occupational licensing for qualified military service members and their spouses. III. Provides for in-state tuition at any university system or community college system institution for military-connected students.

The post Bill Hearings for Week of January 17, 2022 appeared first on NH Liberty Alliance.

The Porcupine Peace Plan: How NH independence could boost American security and stop Armageddon

Free Keene - Fri, 2022-01-14 23:51 +0000

if it wants continued NH military support, Taiwan should let its civilians defend themselves .  Photo by Wang Yu Ching / Office of the President Lcns. CCA 2.0

Here’s an edgy proposal which is closer to realization than you think: New Hampshire should withdraw from the United States and its alliances, then request a significant reduction in gun control within member states as a minimum condition of rejoining. Why?  Because NH is more humane than DC, and because nations with significant gun control are too vulnerable and costly and for us to help defend.  First let’s discuss the elephant in the room:  NH independence and some of the incidents which have driven it forward.

On March 12, 2006 five U.S. soldiers violated, then murdered, 14-year-old Abeer Hamza in her home at Yusufiyah, Iraq. Then they covered up the killing by wiping out most of her family, partly at NH taxpayer expense. 1

Fifteen years and four days later, several dozen U.S. policy enforcement officers stormed a quiet neighborhood in America’s Pleasantville: Keene, New Hampshire. After using a battering ram connected to an armored vehicle, they flew a drone through the window of a home studio housing the state’s top radio discussion show, Free Talk Live. Washington claimed that some of its libertarian hosts had been selling significant amounts of Bitcoin without government permission and filed charges of “unlicensed money transmission.” The imperial capitol is seeking life imprisonment for at least one of the arrestees, with no credible claim that he even victimized anyone. 2

Though different in a hundred ways, each of these Federal excesses exemplified the numberless grievances which have sparked a growing pushback against D.C. in the “Live Free or Die” state. Local activists and legislators reacted with the New Hampshire Independence Amendment, also known as CACR 32. This constitutional revision would allow all NH residents to vote in a 2022 referendum on whether the state will continue being governed by Washington.

New Hampshire already has a long history of example-setting. But by striving for independence – and a more humane world security protocol – its citizens may be able to do something better. With your help, and the careful placement of a new idea on the geopolitical board, maybe our tiny new nation could even stop a world war.

NH independence proponents make a simple case. The FedGov, they say, has bloated beyond the point where normal individuals can meaningfully oppose its atrocities with conventional civics. They point to the successes of Estonian and British independence movements as well as the global trend toward “smaller nations.” In 1900 there were roughly 60 countries in the world. Now there are about 200. Meanwhile, thanks to these and other national divorces, the harm-inflicting capacity of various empires is less than it would be if they were still full-sized. Successful independence drives in America, too, should have a limiting effect on U.S. warmongering in faraway places.

But what of, say, Chinese government warmongering outside its borders? Whatever cruelties the U.S. government may have imposed, the nations bordering China do seem to generally prefer alliance with Washington over alliance with Beijing; some rely on D.C. for their security more than they should.

One of the main criticisms of NH independence is that it could undermine U.S. defense capability or, more accurately, American capacity for carrying out the existing commitments to NATO and Taiwan. The latter is of special significance, and we’ll use it as the focus of this discussion. But the arguments here apply to every U.S. ally.

Critics argue that America is overextended, much as Britain was overextended in the 1939 era when it guaranteed Poland against the Nazis. In those days the perception was that London had only two available courses of action: Wage war on Germany or appease Hitler by abandoning Poland. Today people imagine that we face a similar unthinkable choice as China flexes its new powers against Taiwan. An invasion of the island could trigger these same two ruinous impulses against a great resurgent Power, this time with the likelihood it would escalate into nuclear war. Taiwan’s friends, the thinking goes, would either have to commit another Munich…or defend the quasi-nation by risking civilization. Wouldn’t a New Hampshire independence drive damage America’s ability to follow the second option to victory?

Actually, there is a third option which could prevent both the evils of “big war” and the abandonment of overseas promises. An independent New Hampshire, or prospect thereof, is one way to put that path on the table. Let’s call this option the “Porcupine Peace Plan” for now…in honor of a less-threatening but better-defended posture some of us envision for America’s alliances.

This plan rests upon the barely-discussed idea that there is a great, untapped defense capacity among all reasonably-prosperous peoples, especially in Taiwan. Unlike military buildup it is a power which, when exercised, saves tax dollars rather than spending them…increases freedoms rather than reducing them. It possesses little potential for starting wars of aggression but has a proven history of discouraging them. Nevertheless, this power is often suppressed by the rulers of vulnerable nations…even as some of them face invasion or treat nuclear first-strikes as a legitimate method of self-protection. 2b

This seemingly magical ability…is the power of armed, individual self-defense…weapons freedom for the private citizen. And it is a power that the government of Taiwan has systematically denied to its people, at grave risk to a nervous world. The island’s gun control laws are so strict that WorldPopulationReview.com lists the number of civilian firearms there at literally zero per 100 persons (the U.S. has 120). Historically, the relative gun freedom of America helped it win the Revolutionary War and limited its risk of invasion over the following centuries.2c

We must respect the wishes of Taiwanese regarding their internal laws. But Taipei should respect our wishes when it comes to whether we risk our lives for them over their willful self-emasculation. We currently are doing exactly that at their government’s request; every last American is potentially on Beijing’s target list.3 And Taipei has unnecessarily increased the chances for war with Beijing…by keeping its civilians disarmed.

This policy cannot help but cause Taiwan to be a far more attractive target for invasion than it would be if it had weapons freedom for the average citizen. The island’s well-meaning government has formidable armed forces, but there is no substitute for the “defense dispersal” and individual initiative which comes from civilian weaponry. Gun freedom, in 1940, made fascist-surrounded Switzerland impractical for Germany to invade. 4 Norway, by contrast, was heavily defended by the British Empire and nowhere near surrounded…but fell quickly when Hitler’s forces mounted an attack on “central points of failure.” 4b

Gun availability for the average person can solve only so many problems, but nations which acquire this freedom also acquire a ready-made, widely-dispersed guerilla arsenal ready for use against any occupier. It lets a tiny nation do what Sun Tzu suggested, and “be like water.” When added to Taiwan’s existing military deterrent…this “scary freedom” should be enough to prevent invasion indefinitely.

Skeptical? Then you tell us: How well has the U.S. “nuclear government” fared against Afghan riflemen? Why is Beijing so terrified of guns that it has enacted some of the world’s strictest prohibitions against civilian-owned weaponry? 4c

Thanks to Taipei, the mainland communists don’t have much of that to be terrified of in Taiwan. They don’t have to factor civie-guns much into their “invasion equation” as Hitler did when he abandoned his plan to attack Switzerland. Ending this citizen-dis-empowerment could be just enough to prevent the expected attack on Taiwan. And New Hampshire can gently make the case…either through government policy or constructive private action. Here are the suggested steps to get us there:

1) The New Hampshire Independence Amendment must get a full and fair hearing by our State and Federal Relations committee and face the full legislature without substantial alteration. This will give NHexiters new clout to advance the Porcupine Peace Plan. In the unlikely event Independence obtains legislative super-majorities on this first try, it would then go before the people. If they vote “yes” then…?

2) Neutral by default, the newly independent nation could begin negotiations on whether it will re-join the alliances it has just departed.

3) The negotiators should request, as a minimal precondition for re-joining, that Taiwan and other countries take steps of their own choosing to undo the invasion-friendly types of laws we’ve outlined above. It would be on the Taiwanese themselves to figure out how they want to handle this…and on us to decide whether their reforms, if any, are sufficient to win us over as renewed allies. The more weapon freedom they can offer their people, the more we’d want to join.

4) If Taipei can’t accept this suggestion, loyally and responsibly given, New Hampshire could simply remain neutral and is probably better off that way anyhow. As Switzerland and Costa Rica have proven, neutrality can be much safer than joining an alliance. But we will have kept faith with the beleaguered island.

Even if New Hampshire doesn’t get past step one in 2022, we should at least be able to put the gun-control-helps-invaders issue on the table. And the same weapon freedom concerns which apply to Taiwan…should apply toward any potential ally, even as new personal defenses begin to replace firearms. A cheaper and more humane way of looking at security…may start to set in.
Objections

A) Crime concerns. Taipei presumably keeps its people disarmed in an honest attempt to reduce violent crime and/or uprising. Probably there is a fear that relaxation of gun laws would cause these to increase. There are not many test cases of real gun freedom in first-world Asia; we Westerners can only tell our own tale. We know that the U.S. states with the least gun control also have the least crime. New Hampshire, for example, has virtually no gun laws of its own and the second-highest level of gun freedom in America. Perhaps because of this it also has the second-lowest crime rate, and there was no violent uprising here during the 2020 unrest. Meanwhile the District of Columbia has gun restrictions comparable to Taiwan’s, “some of the strongest gun violence prevention legislation in the nation.”4d Perhaps because of this…it also has America’s highest rate of violent crime and two semi-violent protests since 2020 which partially penetrated White House and Capitol Building defenses respectively. 5

The statistics are not always so clear-cut in favor of gun freedom as a crime reducer….but they do not take into account the potential – much greater – violence of the wars which gun control enables.

B ) Gun incidents – More weapons could mean more accidents and suicides; people would need to get up to speed on firearm safety. For the sake of argument let’s assume it would also mean more crime. But let’s keep these challenges in context. Taipei’s gun control has helped create a situation where the U.S. Navy is prepping for a possibly civilization-ending fleet battle over Taiwan, projected to cost it more than 10,000 lives on the first day of full engagement. 5b

C) Disruption. The Porcupine Peace Plan could trigger more independence legislation or otherwise distract Beijing’s target governments at a time when they arguably need to focus on preventing/winning the hot/cold war. If we’re an unwelcome disruption, perhaps we can make up for it. Maybe we could trigger a larger volunteer effort to help Taiwan deter invasion, with her consent. The goal should be lawful, private weapon and ammo shipments to Taiwanese civilians. But perhaps medicines or other pre-positioned supplies are doable now on an individual basis. Stay tuned to
https://forum.shiresociety.com/t/the-porcupine-peace-plan-how-nh-independence-could-boost-american-security-and-stop-armageddon/13021
as we discuss or act on this further. How much do you want to bet we find other infuriating regulatory hurdles against helping the islanders…

Meanwhile, it should not be hard for New Hampshirites, thinking, acting, maybe even being outside the box, to do better for Taiwan than we have in the past. Last year we were just another tiny assimilated unit in the Pacific alliance…paying taxes to the fumbling U.S. torture state but giving little thought to our sister democracy on Formosa. There is plenty of room for improvement.

D) The next objection should come from you. Visit to the link above if you’d like to raise concerns publicly. You can also contact me there, or volunteer to help. This idea is potentially world-changing, but I’m just another de-platformed videographer; what I can do alone is very limited without you.

Ultimately, this idea is not competing with perfect. It’s competing with the existing, terrifying options which unimaginative bureaucracies have handed us: Appeasement and nuclear war. You don’t need much speed to win a race with turtles, but urgency is indicated. For Taiwan and an honorable world peace…time is probably running out.

Dave Ridley
NHexit.com

Sources:
1 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mahmudiyah_rape_and_killings

2 https://www.unionleader.com/news/crime/claiming-flight-risk-judge-orders-free-keene-activist-held-until-bitcoin-money-laundering-trial/article_04baa708-5613-5bc2-9f58-ac97b76616d6.html

2b https://www.nytimes.com/2021/05/22/us/politics/nuclear-war-risk-1958-us-china.html

2c https://davekopel.org/2A/LawRev/american-revolution-against-british-gun-control.html

3 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/No_first_use

4 https://davekopel.org/2A/Foreign/swiss-and-their-guns.html , https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Tannenbaum

4b https://www.britannica.com/event/World-War-II/The-invasion-of-Norway

4c https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gun_control_in_China

4d https://giffords.org/lawcenter/gun-laws/washington-dc/

5 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_U.S._states_and_territories_by_violent_crime_rate https://www.freedominthe50states.org/guns , https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Floyd_protests_in_Washington%2C_D.C.

5b https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_keFhXPclns

Will NH be first to decriminalize psilocybin mushrooms via the state legislature?

Free Keene - Fri, 2022-01-14 23:29 +0000

Dried Psilocybin Mushrooms, photo from Northspore.com

Thanks to the efforts of activist group Decriminalize Nature, cities across the United States have decriminalized the possession of mushrooms containing psilocybin. From Oakland, CA to nearby Northampton, MA, city councils have voted unanimously to direct law enforcement to essentially ignore people who possess psychedelic mushrooms. Plus, the entire state of Oregon legalized shrooms via a ballot initiative in 2020.

Thus far, however, no state has yet decriminalized psilocybin mushrooms via the legislative process. Perhaps New Hampshire will be the first with HB 1349, a bill that proposes to make the possession of up to 12 grams of psilocybin mushrooms a mere violation with a $100 fine, instead of a felony.

It’s easy to be skeptical that such a change can happen here in New Hampshire, given the state was slow to decriminalize cannabis, but finally did in 2017. However, the tide is shifting on the issue of psilocybin mushrooms. The reason that city councils are voting unanimously to decriminalize shrooms is because they really do help a lot of people with serious mental problems like PTSD and depression. The studies on this are numerous and growing. It is hard for city councilors to deny retired military veterans who testify that psilocybin has cured them of PTSD, or people with terminal diseases who will testify that psilocybin has helped them be at ease with death. Plus, it has long been known that psilocybin mushrooms are safe to use, even compared with cannabis.

Drug Harm to Society and the User

As I pointed out in my testimony in front of the state house Criminal Justice committee on Wednesday, the most relevant thing they should consider is that the New Hampshire Supreme Court ruled in December of 2020 that using psilocybin mushrooms for religious reasons is legal in New Hampshire. Jeremy Mack was arrested for possession of psilocybin mushrooms and convicted in Superior Court. He appealed, arguing it was his right, as a member of the Oklevueha Native American Church to use psilocybin as part of his religion.

In a UNANIMOUS decision, the NH supremes overturned Mack’s conviction, pointing out that the New Hampshire constitution has stronger religious freedom protections than the United States constitution. While the US constitution protects the right to religion, the NH constitution protects your right to worship God how you choose:

Every individual has a natural and unalienable right to worship God according to the dictates of his own conscience, and reason; and no subject shall be hurt, molested, or restrained, in his person, liberty, or estate, for worshipping God in the manner and season most agreeable to the dictates of his own conscience; or for his religious profession, sentiments, or persuasion; provided he doth not disturb the public peace or disturb others in their religious worship. -Article 5, NH Constitution Bill of Rights

Given this amazing court decision, the religious use of psilocybin mushrooms is already fully legal in New Hampshire. Now the legislature should catch up and stop the police from even arresting psilocybin users at all, by passing HB 1349. I am optimistic for its chances. At the hearing on Wednesday, the only person who spoke against the bill was a drug warrior from the NH State Police, who trotted out the usual scare tactics of “DANGER” and “THE CHILDREN”. Though by pointing out that his kids told him shrooms are available for sale in their school, he inadvertently admits the abject failure of his precious War on Drugs.

Here’s the full hearing video:

If you live in New Hampshire and want to help this bill get passed, please reach out to the Criminal Justice committee via this group email: HouseCriminalJusticeandPublicSafety@leg.state.nh.us and ask them to pass HB 1349.

Free Software: Something Most Libertarians & Socialists Agree On? Or Almost

Free Keene - Fri, 2022-01-14 00:18 +0000

On Tuesday a democrat in New Hampshire’s house introduced a bill in support of free software. The House Bill (HB) 1273 would be a step forward for software freedom. It proposes to help protect the user freedom of New Hampshire residents in a number of important ways.

  • Prohibits the state government from requiring residents to use proprietary software, whether in remote court appearances, tax filings, standardized test-taking, coursework in public schools, or matters relating to any state benefits
  • Forbid employers from using non-compete clauses to prevent their employees from contributing to free software
  • Prevents state agencies from mandating the use of non-free JavaScript
  • Prohibits NH law enforcement from participating in the investigation or prosecution of copyright claims brought by proprietary software developers against free software developers
  • Forms a state commission to promote the use of free software in state agencies

Now much of the legislation is a bit wishy-washy with no real teeth, but there are some parts that in theory if passed could have a beneficial impact on our freedom. Other parts could be a little more problematic for those who are libertarian and do not believe in the use of violence to achieve social and political objectives (outside that of a defensive nature anyway). Fortunately most of the bill is tailored toward government and is more defensive in nature than not. Some not so great parts would likely also not have much real world impact.

One part in particular should get libertarians everywhere excited. While it probably was not intended by the legislator proposing the bill, a democrat, it would none-the-less be an amazing step forward in reducing the harm of violent thugs in government. The bill would ensure that users have the right to access the source code for any device utilized in the creation of evidence. This would in effect result in evidence being thrown out whereby the government could not produce the source code to the device that created it. Evidence from such devices as radar guns would no longer be valid in court for all practical purposes. The reason for this is that the suppliers of such devices will not release such source code and thereby prosecutors won’t be able to comply with the law. Before the socialists get upset by this though it’s something everyone should be concerned about. It’s already well known that these devices are full of bugs and this would likely result in evidence being invalidated everywhere if the code were released- not just in NH- and so the device manufacturers would never want to do this short of significant improvements to the code. The solution is to pass this in more states and force manufacturers hand-else let this stand as a means of eliminating a law that should not be in that there is no party that can actually show injury.

To have any real chance of seeing this pass the legislation would likely need to be significantly trimmed. Some parts are problematic such as the forbidding of employers from using non-compete clauses to prevent their employees from contributing to free software for instance. This would likely be unpopular with many state legislators who otherwise support software freedom while also supporting ones right to negotiate a contract free of government interference. Maybe there is a way to put this into law that were more freedom-focused, like letting such terms be unenforceable via law, but either way much of the legislature isn’t going to want to interfere in the private affairs of employee-employer relations either way. I suspect this is likely to have little impact in either case given non-compete clauses within the free software world are already taboo and many of us (myself included) would not sign (or require it) such in an employment contract.

One interesting aspect of the bill is that it would prohibit NH law enforcement from partaking in investigation or prosecution of copyright claims against free software developers. While I can in good conscious support this and would go farther to argue for the elimination of copyright it’s unclear to me where this is currently an issue. Maybe it’s connected to the breaking of digital restrictions such as would be the case with something like DeCSS. A free software program that breaks encryption on commercial DVDs. This falls under copyright law and might be prosecuted by state agencies although that said it’s normally a federal offense. State law enforcement can generally however prosecute federal crimes as I understand it or otherwise partake in federal investigation and prosecution thereof. Of which is more common I do believe with civil asset forfeiture cases.

In spite of some of the issues with the legislation a small contingent of libertarians showed up to more or less in support the legislation as well as others from the free software community. One Jon “maddog” Hall, the Board Chair for the Linux Professional Institute, for instance came out and spoke in favor of the legislation.

Jon “maddog” Hall is the Board Chair for the Linux Professional Institute

The main theme surrounding the hearing seemed to be that of software security and the cost of implementation. New Hampshire’s head of IT for instance also spoke from what appeared to be a purchased lobbyist point-of-view. Declaring more or less that it would be of significant burden and cost to transition to free software (while saying they’re already using free software humorously). The opposing side of course pointed out the truth in that there is always a cost to migrate from one release of a program to another, but it’s not significantly different from that of migrating to free software. Not to mention that while free software isn’t about price, but the liberty, security, and control, this twisting and confusing of the bill was quite disingenuous. The long term costs are reduced as no license agreements need be acquired. Commercial support is generally available too despite the head of IT trying to confuse the reps by comparing commercial software to free software. These are for all intensive purposes one and the same. You can acquire commercial support from Redhat for instance for free software and even much of Microsoft’s own code is based on free software. This bill was about libre, not gratis where libre means freedom, and gratis means price.

While the head of NH IT argued against free software on the basis of features, commercial support, and security the reality is these are more often than not mute points given features can be added to free software unlike the proprietary software he favored. Security bugs can be fixed not at the whim of a particular company, but that of either, you, the community, or the commercial entity you contract with for said free software (example: Redhat). Yes- you can buy free software and many companies do. Just because something is libre doesn’t mean you can’t or shouldn’t pay for its development/support. And unlike proprietary software free software can be seen, read, and audited by third parties with or without the consent of the company producing it (once released). These are the things that ensure security- not anti-virus software or proprietary software vendors of which the former is a kin to putting up a fence and expecting it to stop ants from coming onto your property. The head of IT didn’t stop there- even implying that free software was insecure through association with Bitcoin. While not said outright during the hearing he referenced recent socially engineered attacks on municipalities. Somewhat recently there were reports of municipalities being ‘hacked’- which were in reality social engineering attacks primarily involving the traditional banking system. It was only after the attacks occurred and the money paid by employees of the municipalities to criminals overseas that said money was utilized to purchase Bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies. If there is a flaw- it’s not the software- and it’s certainly not the result of it being libre.

Video Of The Hearing On House Bill (HB) 1273

Bill Hearings for Week of January 10, 2022

N.H. Liberty Alliance - Sun, 2022-01-09 18:19 +0000
  • These are the most liberty-critical hearings for the week
  • Click on the bill number to read the bill.
  • Click on the committee name to email the committee your thoughts.

Of the 181 hearings in the House, we are recommending support of 23 and opposition of 19 with 25 being of interest.
Of the 74 hearings in the Senate, we are recommending support of 3 and opposition of 3 with 18 being of interest.

Position Bill Title Committee Day Time Room State Analysis
Of Interest SB240 apportioning state senate districts. Election Law and Municipal Affairs Mon 1/10 1:00 PM SH Room Reps Hall This bill establishes new state senate districts in accordance with the latest federal decennial census.
Of Interest SB241 apportioning executive council districts. Election Law and Municipal Affairs Mon 1/10 1:00 PM SH Room Reps Hall This bill establishes new councilor districts based on the latest federal decennial census.
Of Interest SB253 apportioning state senate districts. Election Law and Municipal Affairs Mon 1/10 1:00 PM SH Room Reps Hall This bill establishes new state senate districts in accordance with the latest federal decennial census.
Of Interest SB254 apportioning executive council districts. Election Law and Municipal Affairs Mon 1/10 1:00 PM SH Room Reps Hall This bill establishes new councilor districts based on the latest federal decennial census.
Of Interest HB1465 relative to the appointment of counsel for juveniles. Children and Family Law Tue 1/11 10:00 AM LOB Room 206-208 This bill amends the procedure and liability for costs for appointment of counsel for a juvenile. The bill also establishes procedures for the court to use in determining whether to use a statement or a confession from a juvenile.
Of Interest HB1568 raising the age of juvenile delinquency from 18 to 21. Children and Family Law Tue 1/11 10:45 AM LOB Room 206-208 This bill increases the age of juvenile delinquency from 18 to 21.
Of Interest HB1382 relative to the presumption of shared parenting in the determination of parental rights and responsibilities. Children and Family Law Tue 1/11 2:30 PM LOB Room 206-208 This bill: I. Clarifies that the fact that a child is home schooled is not dispositive in allocating parental rights and responsibilities. II. Establishes a rebuttable presumption that equal parenting time is in the best interest of the child and requires the court to provide the basis for finding that the presumption does not apply in a particular case. III. Provides that both parents shall have access to the child’s records unless the parenting plan or court order provides otherwise. IV. Provides that the court shall give substantial weight to the input of a mature minor who is at least 14 years of age.
Oppose SB215 relative to motor vehicle liability insurance policy minimum coverage. Commerce Tue 1/11 9:45 AM SH Room 100 This bill requires a motor vehicle liability insurance policy to provide certain minimum coverages once the named insured becomes the owner of the vehicle.
Of Interest HB1530 relative to bachelor’s degrees offered by the community college system of New Hampshire. Education Tue 1/11 10:30 AM LOB Room 205-207 This bill authorizes institutions in the community college system of New Hampshire to grant bachelor’s degrees.
Of Interest HB1574 prohibiting the university system and community college systems of New Hampshire from charging out-of-state tuition to students voting in New Hampshire. Education Tue 1/11 1:00 PM LOB Room 205-207 This bill prohibits the university system and community college systems of New Hampshire from charging out-of-state tuition to students voting in New Hampshire
Of Interest SB368 relative to animal vending licenses. Energy and Natural Resources Tue 1/11 10:00 AM SH Room 103 This bill details the process for transferring animals after a animal vending license is revoked.
Oppose SB369 relative to organic farming. Energy and Natural Resources Tue 1/11 10:15 AM SH Room 103 This bill requires the department of agriculture, markets, and food to administer an organic certification program and makes an appropriation therefor.
Of Interest HB1273 relative to the use of free and open source software. Executive Departments and Administration Tue 1/11 10:30 AM LOB Room 302-304 This bill: I. Prohibits certain non-compete clauses and non-disclosure agreements regarding free software projects and the sharing of open source software. II. Prohibits, with limited exception, state agencies from using proprietary software in interactions with the public. III. Recognizes the value of data portability and directs the department of information technology to adopt a policy protecting data portability. IV. Prohibits state and local law enforcement from participating in the enforcement of copyright claims against free and open source software projects. V. Establishes a commission to study the use of free software by state agencies. VI. Establishes a software purchasing policy that permits the purchase of proprietary software and hardware only when free software alternatives are not available. VII. Allows the defendant to examine the source code of proprietary software used to generate evidence against the defendant in a criminal proceeding.
Of Interest HB1581 relative to the use of open source software by state agencies. Executive Departments and Administration Tue 1/11 11:15 AM LOB Room 302-304 This bill directs state agencies to consider whether proprietary or open source software is the most cost effective for the agency and requires state procurement documents to include language regarding consideration of open source software.
Of Interest HB1244 relative to parental consent to medical and dental treatments of children in schools. Health, Human Services and Elderly Affairs Tue 1/11 11:00 AM LOB Room 210-211 This bill requires a child’s parent or legal guardian to consent to any medical or dental treatment provided in a school setting.
Support HB1466 relative to the off-label use of prescription drugs and relative to pharmacy prescriptions. Health, Human Services and Elderly Affairs Tue 1/11 11:30 AM LOB Room 210-211 This bill prohibits disciplinary action against a physician for prescribing an FDA approved drug, biologic, or medical device for off-label use. The bill also prohibits disciplinary action against a pharmacist for filling a valid prescription for off-label use.
Of Interest HB1130 relative to restroom access for persons with certain medical conditions. Health, Human Services and Elderly Affairs Tue 1/11 1:00 PM LOB Room 210-211 This bill requires retail establishments to allow individuals with medical conditions, like Crohn’s disease and colitis, to use employee toilet facilities under certain circumstances.
Of Interest HB1634 relative to state grants for researching the effects on the human body of COVID-19 vaccines. Health, Human Services and Elderly Affairs Tue 1/11 2:45 PM LOB Room 210-211 This bill establishes a COVID-19 research grant program in the department of health and human services and makes an appropriation for this purpose.
Of Interest SB293 relative to penalties for violation of privacy. Judiciary Tue 1/11 1:00 PM SH Room 100 This bill increases the penalty for a second or subsequent offense for violations of privacy.
Of Interest SB295 relative to penalties for violations of privacy. Judiciary Tue 1/11 1:15 PM SH Room 100 This bill amends the penalties for certain nonconsensual violations of privacy.
Oppose HB1419 relative to establishing a New Hampshire civilian climate corps advisory commission. Science, Technology and Energy Tue 1/11 10:30 AM LOB Room 306-308 This bill establishes a civilian climate corps advisory commission.
Oppose HB1506 establishing a revolving clean energy accelerator fund in the department of energy. Science, Technology and Energy Tue 1/11 1:00 PM LOB Room 306-308 This bill creates a clean energy accelerator fund, administered by the department of energy, to finance goods and services producing low or zero greenhouse gas emissions and use other financial tools to mitigate climate change.
Oppose HB1601 relative to funding of the NHsaves program Science, Technology and Energy Tue 1/11 2:00 PM LOB Room 306-308 This bill amends the amount of RGGI allowance revenues that are rebated to retail electricity ratepayers.
Oppose HB1621 relative to reducing the rebates distributed by the energy efficiency fund. Science, Technology and Energy Tue 1/11 3:00 PM LOB Room 306-308 This bill eliminates the rebate amount distributed to retail electricity ratepayers and allocates all auction proceeds to support current or future energy efficiency resource standards programs.
Oppose SB306 relative to the penalties for various motor vehicle violations. Transportation Tue 1/11 1:00 PM LOB Room 101 This bill provides for enhanced penalties for certain driving offenses where the offense was also based on facts involving the prohibited use of a mobile electronic device.
Support SB310 relative to license plate scanning. Transportation Tue 1/11 1:20 PM LOB Room 101 This bill permits the owners of private property to obtain and use a license plate reader for the sole purpose of recording and checking license plates.
Support HB1189 permitting voluntary donations to municipalities or the state to fund certain projects or to reduce taxation. Ways and Means Tue 1/11 9:00 AM LOB Room 202-204 This bill allows a municipality or the state to establish a voluntary donations fund to be expended for certain local or state projects or to reduce amount raised through taxation.
Of Interest HB1591 eliminating the enforcement division of the liquor commission. Commerce and Consumer Affairs Wed 1/12 10:45 AM LOB Room 302-304 This bill eliminates the enforcement division of the liquor commission.
Of Interest HB1502 relative to digital assets and digital securities. Commerce and Consumer Affairs Wed 1/12 1:15 PM LOB Room 302-304 This bill specifies that digital assets are property within the Uniform Commercial Code; authorizes security interests in digital assets, allows banks to provide custodial services for digital asset property and provides procedures for the provision of custodial services.
Support HB1503 exempting the developer, seller, or facilitator of the exchange of an open blockchain token from certain securities laws. Commerce and Consumer Affairs Wed 1/12 2:00 PM LOB Room 302-304 This bill exempts the developer, seller, or facilitator of the exchange of an open blockchain token from certain securities laws.
Of Interest HB1504 relative to special purpose depository institutions. Commerce and Consumer Affairs Wed 1/12 2:45 PM LOB Room 302-304 This bill establishes a special class of depository institutions, creates regulations pertaining to them, and amends existing law to allow for the special class in the regulatory scheme of banking within the state.
Support HB1349 decriminalizing the possession and use of psilocybin mushrooms. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Wed 1/12 9:00 AM LOB Room 202-204 This bill decriminalizes the possession or use of a certain amount or psilocybin mushrooms by a person 18 years of age or older.
Support HB1215 relative to the definition of “residual amount” in the controlled drug act. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Wed 1/12 10:00 AM LOB Room 202-204 This bill amends the definition of “residual amount” of a controlled drug and changes the penalty for such amount.
Oppose HB1361 establishing a penalty for any person who transports a controlled drug into New Hampshire with the intent to distribute. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Wed 1/12 10:30 AM LOB Room 202-204 This bill establishes an additional penalty for transportation of a controlled drug into New Hampshire with the intent to distribute.
Support HB1296 relative to money, coin, or currency which may be forfeited in connection with a drug offense. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Wed 1/12 11:15 AM LOB Room 202-204 This bill limits the scope of money, coin, currency, and other property which is presumed to be subject to forfeiture under the controlled drug act.
Support HB1232 reducing the penalty for first offense drug possession and repealing certain mandatory minimum sentences. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Wed 1/12 1:45 PM LOB Room 202-204 This bill reduces the penalties and removes mandatory minimum sentences for certain first offense drug offenses.
Support HB1360 relative to penalties for controlled drug violations. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Wed 1/12 2:15 PM LOB Room 202-204 This bill changes the penalty for certain schedule I, II, III, and IV drug offenses.
Support HB1392 relative to penalties for nonviolent drug offenses and repealing the criminal penalties for possession of drug paraphernalia. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Wed 1/12 2:45 PM LOB Room 202-204 This bill reduces the penalties for nonviolent drug offenses and eliminates the prohibitions and penalties for the possession, use, or sale of drug paraphernalia.
Oppose HB1657 establishing a New Hampshire farm to school reimbursement program. Education Wed 1/12 10:30 AM LOB Room 205-207 This bill establishes a New Hampshire farm to school reimbursement program and makes an appropriation therefor.
Oppose HB1655 relative to natural immunity system health and wellness curriculum in schools. Education Wed 1/12 11:00 AM LOB Room 205-207 This bill requires instruction of kindergarten through high school students on natural immunity health and wellness programs.
Oppose HB1684 limiting education freedom account funding to budgeted amounts. Education Wed 1/12 2:15 PM LOB Room 205-207 This bill limits the amounts of funds appropriated from the education trust fund to the education freedom account program to budgeted sums.
Oppose HB1680 establishing a foundation opportunity budget program for funding public education. Education Wed 1/12 3:00 PM LOB Room 205-207 This bill modifies the determination and funding for an opportunity for a constitutionally adequate education by establishing foundation opportunity budgets and state foundation opportunity grants.
Of Interest SB328 relative to the date of the state primary election. Election Law and Municipal Affairs Wed 1/12 1:40 PM SH Room 103 This bill changes the date of the state primary election to the third Tuesday in June.
Of Interest SB364 relative to the use of electronic poll books. Election Law and Municipal Affairs Wed 1/12 2:00 PM SH Room 103 This bill extends the time requirement for markup of a backup checklist in the use of electronic poll books.
Of Interest SB366 requiring an audit of ballots cast in the 2022 primary and general election. Election Law and Municipal Affairs Wed 1/12 2:20 PM SH Room 103 This bill requires an audit of ballots cast in the 2022 state primary and general elections.
Of Interest SB223 relative to requirements for recovery houses. Executive Departments and Administration Wed 1/12 9:00 AM SH Room 103 This bill modifies the requirements for facility bedroom square-footage in order for recovery houses to be exempted from certain requirements of the state fire code by the state fire marshal.
Of Interest SB226 establishing a recruitment and retention program for state employment. Executive Departments and Administration Wed 1/12 9:15 AM SH Room 103 This bill establishes specific criteria allowing the director of the division of personnel, department of administrative services, to develop a state employee recruitment and retention program.
Of Interest SB363 relative to service credit for certain group II retirement eligibility. Executive Departments and Administration Wed 1/12 9:50 AM SH Room 103 This bill allows certain retirement system members to purchase nonqualified service time as group II creditable service in order to reduce certain transition provision requirements for retirement.
Oppose SB281 relative to nursing home policies regarding notice of vacancy. Health and Human Services Wed 1/12 9:30 AM LOB Room 101 This bill prohibits a private nursing home or assisted living facility from enforcing a 30-day notice of vacancy policy in the event of a resident’s death and provides that, in such cases, the month in which the resident passes shall be the last month for which payment is due.
Support SB282 relative to advertising oneself as a doctor of acupuncture. Health and Human Services Wed 1/12 9:45 AM LOB Room 101 This bill permits certain practitioners to advertise as doctors of acupuncture.
Oppose HB1235 relative to compensation paid to a crime victim. Judiciary Wed 1/12 10:00 AM LOB Room 206-208 This bill increases the maximum recovery per claimant under the victims’ assistance fund and establishes a maximum recovery amount for victims under the FRM victims contribution recovery fund. The bill also extends the repeal date of the FRM victims contribution recovery fund.
Support HB1101 relative to a forfeiture of personal property. Judiciary Wed 1/12 11:00 AM LOB Room 206-208 This bill limits the conditions under which seized property may be transferred to a federal agency.
Of Interest HB1133 prohibiting the termination of a lease during the sale of real property. Judiciary Wed 1/12 1:30 PM LOB Room 206-208 This bill prohibits the termination of a residential lease during the sale of the property being leased.
Of Interest SB304 relative to discrimination in public workplaces and education. Judiciary Wed 1/12 1:45 PM SH Room 100 This bill removes provisions concerning freedom from discrimination in public workplaces and education, and clarifies the authority of public schools and public employers concerning discrimination.
Of Interest SB299 relative to the penalty for escape. Judiciary Wed 1/12 2:00 PM SH Room 100 This bill amends the elements required for charging felony or misdemeanor escape.
Oppose HB1216 repealing the housing appeals board. Judiciary Wed 1/12 2:30 PM LOB Room 206-208 This bill repeals the housing appeals board.
Oppose HB1200 relative to notice of rent increases in residential rental property. Judiciary Wed 1/12 3:00 PM LOB Room 206-208 This bill requires notice by a landlord of at least 45 days of a proposed rent increase.
Of Interest CACR24 the attorney general. Providing that the attorney general be elected by a majority vote of the members of the general court in a joint session. Legislative Administration Wed 1/12 10:45 AM LOB Room 301-303 This constitutional amendment concurrent resolution removes the governor and executive council’s authority to nominate and appoint the attorney general and gives the authority to elect the attorney general to the New Hampshire senate and house of representatives.
Of Interest CACR25 legislative term limits. Providing that no person shall serve more than 15 terms in either the house of representatives or the senate. Legislative Administration Wed 1/12 11:30 AM LOB Room 301-303 This constitutional amendment concurrent resolution establishes a 15-term limit for the New Hampshire house of representatives and the New Hampshire senate, respectively.
Of Interest CACR26 relating to the house of representatives. Providing that 100 of the representatives are elected using party list proportional representation. Legislative Administration Wed 1/12 1:00 PM LOB Room 301-303 This constitutional amendment concurrent resolution mandates that 100 members of the house of representatives be elected by determining the proportions of each party voting in the given election and allocating the amount of members out of 100 to each party based on such proportions.
Of Interest CACR27 elected and appointed officials. Providing that all state court judges shall be subject to recall and removal by petition and vote of registered voters pursuant to provisions established by the legislature. Legislative Administration Wed 1/12 2:00 PM LOB Room 301-303 This constitutional amendment concurrent resolution provides for all state court judges to be subject to recall, removal, and replacement by petition and vote of registered voters.
Of Interest HB1211 requiring the installation of electronic tolling. Public Works and Highways Wed 1/12 1:45 PM LOB Room 201-203 This bill requires the department of transportation to replace all toll booths in the state with electronic tolling by July 1, 2035.
Of Interest HB1593 requiring the department of transportation to erect sound barriers on Interstate Route 95 in the city of Portsmouth. Public Works and Highways Wed 1/12 2:45 PM LOB Room 201-203 This bill requires the department of transportation to erect a sound barrier on Interstate 95 in the city of Portsmouth.
Oppose HB1452 renaming the department of environmental services the department of environmental protection and assigning the department oversight of private drinking water wells. Resources, Recreation and Development Wed 1/12 9:45 AM LOB Room 305-307 This bill changes the name of the department of environmental services to the department of environmental protection and authorizes the department to regulate private drinking wells.
Of Interest HB1292 permitting the use of drones or unmanned aerial vehicles on the statewide trail system. Resources, Recreation and Development Wed 1/12 11:15 AM LOB Room 305-307 This bill permits and regulates the use of small unmanned aircraft on the statewide trail system.
Of Interest HB1227 relative to the definition of prime wetland. Resources, Recreation and Development Wed 1/12 4:00 PM LOB Room 305-307 This bill further defines prime wetland for local protection in fill and dredge permits.
Of Interest SB313 relative to the authority of the office of professional licensure and certification to establish fees. Ways and Means Wed 1/12 9:45 AM SH Room 100 This bill clarifies that the executive director of the office of professional licensure and certification has authority to establish fees on behalf of the boards, commissions, and councils administered by the office of professional licensure and certification.
Support SB345 relative to youth employment. Commerce Thu 1/13 1:15 PM SH Room 100 This bill makes certain changes to the laws governing employment of 14 and 15 year olds.
Of Interest SB209 relative to electronic wage payments. Commerce Thu 1/13 1:30 PM SH Room 100 This bill amends the provisions related to payment of an employee’s wages by direct deposit.
Oppose SB384 requiring notice of the hands-free law at the point of sale for cell phones. Commerce Thu 1/13 1:45 PM SH Room 100 This bill requires notice of the state’s hands-free law at the point of sale for cell phones and other mobile electronic devices.
Of Interest HB1276 allowing for school district budgets and warrant articles to include cost per student information. Education Thu 1/13 11:30 AM LOB Room 205-207 This bill allow for a school district to require the cost per student information be noted on the school district budget and special warrant articles.
Of Interest SB352 relative to substitute teacher criminal history records check. Education Thu 1/13 1:00 PM LOB Room 101 This bill permits substitute teachers who have undergone a criminal records check to work within the same school administrative unit without undergoing an additional records check.
Support HB1298 relative to eligibility for the education tax credit. Education Thu 1/13 1:00 PM LOB Room 205-207 This bill increases the household income level to qualify as an eligible student under the education tax credit program.
Oppose SB420 establishing an extraordinary need grant for schools. Education Thu 1/13 1:45 PM LOB Room 101 This bill establishes an extraordinary need grant for schools in addition to regular adequate education grants and relief grants.
Support HB1137 relative to the duty of school boards to provide education. Education Thu 1/13 2:15 PM LOB Room 205-207 This bill states the duties and responsibilities of elected school boards and allows school boards to contract with any private school approved by the school board as a school tuition program.
Support HB1169 relative to public comment and inquiry during school board meetings. Education Thu 1/13 3:00 PM LOB Room 205-207 This bill establishes requirements for public meetings held by a school board to include a designated time period for questions from the public and answers from the board. The bill also allows an attendee of a meeting of the school board to demand which New Hampshire statute or administrative rule gives the school board the authority described in a school policy or operational procedure.
Oppose HB1535 relative to cost of living adjustments for retirees in the state retirement system. Executive Departments and Administration Thu 1/13 9:00 AM LOB Room 302-304 This bill establishes an initial cost of living adjustment in 2022, and subsequent increases subject to the prior approval of the board of trustees, to be paid by the retirement system on the first $30,000 of a retired member’s or beneficiary’s allowance.
Oppose HB1417 relative to payment by the state of a portion of retirement system contributions of political subdivision employers. Executive Departments and Administration Thu 1/13 10:00 AM LOB Room 302-304 This bill provides that the state shall pay 7.5 percent of contributions of retirement system employers other than the state for group I teachers and group II members.
Oppose SB319 relative to vaccination status and wellness incentives. Health and Human Services Thu 1/13 10:30 AM SH Room Reps Hall This bill requires that all health coverage offered by health carriers to employers shall provide a wellness financial incentive to insured persons when voluntarily supplied with sufficient evidence the insured is currently fully vaccinated for Covid-19 at the time of enrollment. The bill repeals this requirement in 2023.
Support HB1325 relative to release of confidential records of a person appointed a guardian. Judiciary Thu 1/13 1:30 PM LOB Room 206-208 This bill provides that a person appointed a guardian shall retain the right to access and consent to the release of his or her confidential records unless the terms of the appointment provide otherwise.
Oppose CACR14 relating to unions. Providing that all workers have the right to join a union. Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitative Services Thu 1/13 10:00 AM LOB Room 305-307 This constitutional amendment concurrent resolution establishes the right for workers to join a union in the state of New Hampshire.
Oppose CACR28 relating to the minimum wage. Providing that all workers have a right to a minimum wage that provides them with well-being and a dignified existence. Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitative Services Thu 1/13 11:00 AM LOB Room 305-307 This constitutional amendment concurrent resolution provides workers with the right to a minimum wage that provides them with well-being and a dignified existence.
Support HB1089 relative to the unenforceability of noncompete agreements upon termination of an employee for noncompliance with a vaccination mandate. Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitative Services Thu 1/13 1:30 PM LOB Room 305-307 This bill provides that a noncompete agreement between an employer and an employee who is terminated for refusing to comply with an employer-mandated vaccination requirement shall be unenforceable against such employee.
Oppose HB1207 requiring an employer to provide paid time off for an employee to vote. Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitative Services Thu 1/13 2:30 PM LOB Room 305-307 This bill requires an employer to grant an employee paid time off so the employee may vote.
Oppose HB1076 relative to illegal productivity quotas. Labor, Industrial and Rehabilitative Services Thu 1/13 3:00 PM LOB Room 305-307 This bill implements provisions regulating productivity quotas in workplaces.
Of Interest HB1112 relative to competitive bidding in counties. Municipal and County Government Thu 1/13 10:00 AM LOB Room 301-303 This bill establishes a procedure for competitive bidding for purchases made by any county in the state.
Support HB1387 enabling municipalities to adopt a property tax homestead exemption. Municipal and County Government Thu 1/13 11:00 AM LOB Room 301-303 This bill enables municipalities to adopt a property tax homestead exemption against the assessment on a person’s principal place of residence.
Support HB1432 prohibiting the use of state funds for new passenger rail projects. Public Works and Highways Thu 1/13 11:00 AM LOB Room 201-203 This bill prohibits the department of transportation from utilizing state funds for the planning, construction, operation, or management of new passenger rail projects.
Support HB1221 relative to the rates of the business profits tax and the business enterprise tax. Ways and Means Thu 1/13 10:15 AM LOB Room 202-204 This bill reduces the rates of the business profits and business enterprise taxes for tax years ending on or after December 31, 2023.
Support HB1500 reducing the rate of the communications services tax and repealing the tax in 2025. Ways and Means Thu 1/13 1:00 PM LOB Room 202-204 This bill reduces the rate of the communications services tax for 2022 through 2024 and repeals the tax in 2025.
Support HB1204 reducing the rate of the meals and rooms tax and increasing the revenue sharing of meals and rooms tax revenue with municipalities. Ways and Means Thu 1/13 2:00 PM LOB Room 202-204 This bill reduces the rate of the tax on meals, rooms, and gross rental receipts, and increases the percentage of meals and rooms tax revenues distributed to municipalities.
Support HB1539 relative to the removal of certain information from the New Hampshire state police website. Criminal Justice and Public Safety Fri 1/14 1:30 PM LOB Room 202-204 This bill requires the state police to remove certain arrest records from the New Hampshire state police website.
Support HB1091 relative to search warrants for individuals engaged in fish and game activities. Fish and Game and Marine Resources Fri 1/14 10:15 AM LOB Room 305-307 This bill requires conservation officers to obtain a search warrant for conducting certain enforcement operations, unless the person is engaged in the act of taking.
Of Interest HB1308 prohibiting the capture, possession, and propagation of hares and rabbits for hunting dog training and field trials. Fish and Game and Marine Resources Fri 1/14 2:45 PM LOB Room 305-307 This bill prohibits the taking, keeping, or propagation in captivity of snowshoe hares or wild rabbits for the purpose of dog training.
Support HB1092 requiring an official declaration of war for the activation of the New Hampshire national guard. State-Federal Relations and Veterans Affairs Fri 1/14 9:30 AM LOB Room 201-203 This bill limits the activation of the New Hampshire national guard to only those times where the United States Congress has passed an official action pursuant to Article I, Section 8 of the United States Constitution.

The post Bill Hearings for Week of January 10, 2022 appeared first on NH Liberty Alliance.

NH Independence Bill Public Hearing is Jan 20th at 3:30pm – Mark your calendar; tell your friends!

NHexit.US - Wed, 2022-01-05 21:42 +0000
Legislative Office Building, 33 N State St., Concord, NH

A historic time and date is approaching. Late last Summer, a bunch of heroic state representatives filed CACR 32, the NHexit constitutional amendment. That alone was historic, as CACR 32 is the first time ever that the people of any state will be given the opportunity to officially speak to their legislature on the topic of whether or not we should leave the United States empire as we once left the British empire.

That is because unlike many other states, every bill filed in New Hampshire is given a public hearing. So, this will be your chance to speak publicly in favor of independence. If we can pack the hearing with supporters, CACR 32 could have a chance of passing, which would then put it to a vote of the people in November. With 2/3rds voting in support, we would immediately declare peaceful independence from the United States and proceed as a sovereign nation.

Mark your calendar now for January 20th, 3:30pm. The location is the Legislative Office Building in Concord, NH at 33 N State St, room 206. However, the room number is subject to change based on how many people show up. By default, bill hearings are held in small rooms with barely enough seating for the committee and perhaps a dozen attendees. However, if enough people pack the room, the committee will have to move the hearing to a larger room. Join our Telegram or Matrix chat rooms for ongoing updates from on-the-ground, or just ask at the front desk where the State-Federal Relations and Veterans Affairs committee is meeting – hopefully we’ll be easy to spot with a big crowd.

The most important thing you can do is attend this meeting, whether or not you want to speak. Every hearing at the state house also allows you to sign your name to a sheet indicating whether you are for the bill being heard, so at minimum you should sign the sheet in the hearing, and if you are so moved, also sign up to speak in favor of CACR 32. Remember, the bill, if passed would only place the question on the 2022 ballot, so we don’t need to convince the representatives to support secession, only that they should support letting the people vote on it.

Whether or not you can attend the meeting, you can help immediately in other ways:

  • Please reach out to the members of the committee at this email address: HouseState-FederalRelationsandVeteransAffairs@leg.state.nh.us and ask them to support CACR 32 without amendment. That email will deliver to all the committee members.
  • Contact your friends who support independence and tell them the time, date, and place of this meeting and ask them if they can attend. Set up carpools to ease transport.
  • Share this article on your favorite social media to spread the word.
  • Sign the petition to support NH Independence!
  • Brush up on your NH Independence knowledge! Explore the 86 Reasons NH Should Divorce DC and the FAQ from the Foundation for NH Independence.
  • Join our Telegram or Matrix chat rooms to connect directly with other NH Independence supporters in real-time-chat. Both rooms are linked together, so if you join one, you needn’t join the other.
  • Join the Signal chat. This is not connected with Telegram or Matrix.
  • Join our Forum to discuss NHexit with others. Or, if you prefer big tech platforms, we have Facebook and MeWe groups as well.

See you January 20th at 3:30pm at the Legislative Office Building at 33 N State St. in Concord!

“Free State Live” Goes In-Depth on NHexit with Alu Axelman

NHexit.US - Wed, 2022-01-05 02:21 +0000

The Free State Project‘s new internet video show, “Free State Live” had Alu Axelman on last night to discuss New Hampshire independence. It was an excellent discussion and Axelman is a great guest on the subject, as the author of multiple books on secession and the new president of the Foundation for New Hampshire Independence. Here’s the episode:

House Gold Standard – January 05, 2022

N.H. Liberty Alliance - Tue, 2022-01-04 00:41 +0000

(white) goldstandard-01-05-22-H.pdf
(gold) goldstandard-01-05-22-H-y.pdf

 

 

The post House Gold Standard – January 05, 2022 appeared first on NH Liberty Alliance.

The Manchester Free Press aims to bring together in one place everything that you need to know about what’s happening in the Free State of New Hampshire.

As of August 2021, we are currently in the process of removing dead links and feeds, and updating the site with newer ones.

Articles

Media

Blogs

Our friends & allies

New Hampshire

United States

World